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Chapter Two

Relevant Data and Issues

This chapter will review the facilities-related data for the District and will examine critical issues in facilities areas.

The organization of the Gavilan Community College District will continue to be a single college district with designated educational centers. Because of the close proximity of adjacent community colleges, the Board of Governors of the California Community colleges and the California Post Secondary Education Commission (CPEC), in all likelihood, will not approve additional campuses in the District. However, in the long-term, the state may approve educational centers in the northern (Morgan Hill) and southern (Hollister) areas of the District. Any other satellite education centers will need to be developed without state support by working with other educational institutions, public agencies or as partnerships with local business or industry.

In terms of educational delivery systems, there are two general trends that will need to be addressed. The first is that additional emphasis will be placed upon new learning paradigms and new delivery strategies. New learning paradigms will include instructional delivery strategies that are more individualized, self-paced, and accessible at any time of the day or night. This will require an expanded use of technological devices such as computers and computer-related hardware and software both in classrooms and laboratories, and in learning centers. This will also necessitate college faculty and staff developing the appropriate technological skills to support the new delivery systems. The second area to be addressed will be in student services where increasing student diversity will necessitate additions, deletions, or modifications in the delivery of support services. These services may or may not require use of technology, but will require facility spaces that are capable of being modified, as needs change. Facility planning must take into account the need for development of flexible spaces that are capable of being changed.

College staff will need to be sensitive to these subtle changes in the composition and needs of the student body as these trends continue to develop.

  1. Building Information

The following charts describe the relevant data for each building currently listed on the District’s Space Inventory. It should be noted that buildings at outlying locations such as the airport, Hollister, Morgan Hill and Gilroy are included in the inventory and have an impact on the overall capacity load ratio for the College. Logically however, they are not included in the facilities master plan for the main campus.

Table II-A

Gavilan College Space Inventory

October 1, 2000

Bldg.

#

Building

Year

Built

Rms.

Total

ASF

Total

GSF

Efficiency

(%)

Building Use

1

Aviation

1965

8

11,092

12,151

91.3

Aviation Program

2

Chemistry

1967

13

4.289

5,600

76.6

Chemistry, Physical Science

3

Chemistry

1967

11

3,805

5,600

67.9

Physics, Physical Science

4

Life Science

1967

19

6,388

8,316

76.8

Biology, Life Science

5

Gymnasium

1967

31

20,154

26,109

77.2

Phy. Ed., Athletics

6

Library

1967

73

33,240

38,801

85.7

Library, AV/TV, Media

7

Theater

1967

32

11,296

14,271

79.2

Drama

8

Student Union

1967

39

17,910

20,652

86.7

Student Services, Food, Books

9

Maintenance

1967

11

2,021

5,741

35.2

M & O, Warehouse

10

Cosmetology

1968

18

4,879

7,526

64.8

Cosmetology Program

11

Humanities

1968

16

4,692

6,566

71.5

English, Literature, Reading

12

Art

1968

13

4,825

6,107

79.0

Art Program

13

Pool Building

1970

2

340

1,260

27.0

Swimming Program

14

Business

1971

22

9,679

14,460

66.9

Business, Office, Computers

15

Social Science

1974

31

10,240

11,620

88.1

History, Soc., Psy., Gen. Ed.

16

Art Lecture

1974

5

3,255

3,298

98.7

Art, General Education

17

Field Storage

1971

1

170

406

41.9

Storage

18

Paint Storage

1976

1

115

328

35.1

Storage

19

Garden Storage

1967

1

417

504

82.7

Storage

20

Gas Locker

1967

1

84

123

68.3

Gas Storage

21

Storage

1972

1

686

853

80.4

Storage

25

Music/ Chapel

1993

1

769

923

83.3

Exhibits, Meetings

28

CDC Laboratory

1977

9

1,403

1,600

87.7

Child Development

29

CDC Trailer

1992

8

953

960

99.3

Child Development

30

Welding Bunker

1978

1

90

121

74.4

Welding Storage

31

Occupational

1981

14

13,826

17,811

77.6

Automotive, Welding

34

Athletic Storage

1981

1

320

324

98.8

Storage

35

Admin. Services

1981

11

1,642

2,362

69.5

Business Services

40

Maylock House

1910

5

866

1,632

53.1

Auxiliary Services

100

Hollister Center

1996

13

6,267

8,500

73.7

General Education

200

Morgan Hill Ctr.

1997

12

7,048

10,215

69.0

General Education

 

TOTAL

   

182,761

234,740

77.8

 

Table II-B

Gavilan College

Facilities Inventory Based on Category of Space

Space Category

Description

Current

Space Inventory

000

All Other

0

100

Classroom

25,525

210-230

Laboratory

55,113

235-255

Laboratory Service

644

300

Office/Conference

20,828

400

Library

17,829

520-525

Physical Education (Indoor)

19,085

530-535

Instructional Media (AV/TV)

6,707

540-555

Child Care, Clinic

2,411

580

Greenhouse

373

610-625

Assembly/Exhibition

13,427

630-635

Food Service

10,488

650-655

Lounge/Lounge Service

2,605

660-665

Bookstore

1,754

670-690

Meeting /Recreation

1,073

710-715

Data Processing/Comp

682

720-770

Physical Plant

4,217

800

Health Service

0

TOTAL

 

182,761

Source: Space Inventory and Building Facilities Report, conducted on campus by the Maas Companies, October 2000

5-Year Capital Construction Plan

Each February, the college is required to file a 5-Year Capital Construction Plan with the California Community College Chancellor’s Office. This plan serves as the basis for requesting state funding for future capital construction projects. The criteria for state funding is based on a series of formulas that have as their origin the Annual Space Inventory of the District. Essentially, projects are funded by the state when the District demonstrates that the space it currently has in a given category is less than that which is allowed by state formula.

Currently, Gavilan College has three projects that have been funded by the state and are either in the planning or construction stage. These projects are as follows:

  • Health Occupations Building
  • Child Development Center
  • Adaptive Physical Education Building

The Chancellor’s Office has placed a moratorium on new facility proposals for the 2001-2002 fiscal year. This is because all funds have been expended on the 1998 higher education bond act. It is anticipated a new bond act will be submitted to the voters in 2002 and future projects will be submitted based on that bond act.

This Facilities Master Plan will serve as the basis for the development of future 5-Year Capital Construction Plans. It is anticipated that approved projects will need to be submitted by February 2002 to be eligible for the 2002 bond act.

Scheduled Maintenance Projects

A 5-Year Plan for Scheduled (Deferred) maintenance was initially developed in December, 1999 and has been updated for December 15, 2000. In accordance with state guidelines, this plan will continue to be updated annually. The current 5-Year Scheduled Maintenance Plan includes the following projects:

Projects for 2000-2001

1. Install/Replace HVAC Systems-Phase I $400,000.00

2. Roof Replacement-Phase I $250,000.00

    1. Replacement and Renovation of Plumbing
    2. System-Phase I $265,000.00

    3. Electrical and Communication System
    4. Replacement and Renovation-Phase I $300,000.00

      TOTAL $1,215,000.00

      Projects for 2001-2002

      1. Install/Replace HVAC Systems-Phase II $400,000.00

      2. Roof Replacement-Phase II $250,000.00

      3. Replacement and Renovation of Plumbing

      System-Phase II $150,000.00

      4. Electrical and Communication System

      Replacement and Renovation-Phase II $220,000.00

    5. Painting of Building Interiors-Phase I $150,000.00

TOTAL $1,170,000.00

Projects for 2002-2003

1. Install/Replace HVAC Systems-Phase III $400,000.00

2. Roof Replacement-Phase III $250,000.00

3. Replacement and Renovation of Plumbing

System-Phase III $125,000.00

4. Electrical and Communication System

Replacement and Renovation-Phase III $250,000.00

5. Painting of Building Interiors-Phase II $150,000.00

TOTAL $1,175,000.00

Projects for 2003-2004

1. Roof Replacement-Phase IV $250,000.00

2. Painting of Building Exteriors-Phase I $225,000.00

3. Electrical and Communication System

Replacement and Renovation-Phase IV $300,000.00

4. Painting of Building Interiors-Phase III $250,000.00

5. Floor Replacement and Renovation-Phase I $150,000.00

TOTAL $1,175,000.00

Projects for 2004-2005

1. Roof Replacement-Phase V $250,000.00

2. Electrical and Communication System

Replacement and Renovation-Phase V $300,000.00

3. Painting of Building Exteriors-Phase II $225,000.00

4. Floor Replacement and Renovation-Phase II $150,000.00

5. Renovation and Repair of Warehouse $90,000.00

TOTAL $1,015,000.00

Projects for 2005-2006

1. Fire Sprinkler System Installation-Phase I $250,000.00

2. Roof Replacement-Phase VI $250,000.00

3. Electrical and Communication System

Replacement and Renovation-Phase VI $300,000.00

4. Painting of Building Exteriors-Phase III $225,000.00

5. Floor Replacement and Renovation-Phase III $150,000.00

TOTAL $1,175,000.00

 

Master Plan Information

NOTE: The following information is also contained in the Educational Master Plan for Gavilan Community College District. But, as it is highly relevant to the facilities planning process, it is also included in this document. See the Educational Master Plan for a more detailed analysis of the instructional and support services areas.

Analysis and Comparison of the Existing Instructional Program at Gavilan

The following tables and charts are created for the purpose of presenting data on the instructional program at Gavilan. For purposes of comparison to statewide averages and standards, the divisional breakdowns used by Gavilan will be converted into the uniform Taxonomy of Programs and Service (TOPS) Code Listing.

Internal Structure for the Delivery of the College’s Instructional Program

Presented in Table II-C is a breakdown, by division, of Gavilan College’s current instructional program.

Table II-C

Gavilan College

Divisional Structure

Fall – 2000

Division

Disciplines

in the Division

Adaptive Education

1

Allied Health

2

Business and CSIS

9

English

2

Fine Arts

7

Learning Resources

1

Natural Science

8

Physical Education & Athletics

2

Social Sciences, Child Development,

Admin of Justice

8

Vocational Technical

8

Interdisciplinary Studies

3

Source: Gavilan Office of Admissions and Records; Analysis the Maas Companies

Disciplines by "TOPS" Code Listing

The Taxonomy of Programs and Services (the TOPS Code Listing) is the standardized method by which the state views and categories the different disciplines for comparison purposes. It varies substantially from the divisional breakdown used by Gavilan to group the various disciplines. Table II-D provides a relational base from which to view the college’s curricular offerings by TOPS code listing.

Table II-D

Summary of Gavilan College’s Instructional Disciplines by TOPS Code

Department TOPS Code

TOPS

Code

Department

TOPS

Code

Accounting 0500 Geography 2200

Automotive Collision Repair 0900 Geology 1900

Adaptive Education 0800 Guidance 4900

Allied Health 1200 Health Education 0800

Administration of Justice 2100 History 2200

Automotive Mechanics Tech. 0900 Humanities 1500

Aviation Maintenance Tech. 0900 Fire Technology 2100

Anthropology 2200 Journalism 0600

Art 1000 Library Science 1600

Astronomy 1900 Mathematics 1700

Athletics 0800 Management 0500

Biology 0400 Marketing 0500

Business Office Tech. 0500 Music 1000

Child Development 1300 Physical Education 0800

Chemistry 1900 Philosophy 1500

Communications 0600 Physiology 0600

Cosmetology 3000 Paralegal 1400

Computer Graphics and Design 0900 Political Science 2200

Computer Science/Information Sys. 0900 Physical Science 1900

Community Work Experience 4900 Psychology 2000

Ecology 0400 Real Estate 0500

Economics 2200 Sociology 2200

English 1500 Spanish 1100

English as a Second Language 1500 Theatre Arts 1000

General Business 0500 Welding 0900

Source: Maas Companies Database

TOPS Code Listing and Statewide Averages for WSCH

Table II-E is a comparison of statewide and Gavilan averages for curriculum percentages of lecture-generated WSCH and laboratory-generated WSCH. The statewide averages are used as both a baseline and a target for projecting the instructional program of the future.

Table II-E

Comparison of Lecture and Laboratory Weekly Student Contact Hours (WSCH)

Statewide

Averages

Gavilan

Averages

Inatructional

Discipline

TOPS

Code

% WSCH

Lecture

% WSCH

Lab

% WSCH

Lecture

% WSCH

Lab

Biological Science

Business / Mgt.

Communications

Computer Info. Systems

Education /PE

Engineering/Tech

Fine/Applied Arts

Foreign Language

Health Occupations

Consumer Ed/Child Dev

Law

Humanities

Library Science

Mathematics

Physical Science

Psychology

Public Affairs/ Services

Social Science

Commercial Services

Interdisciplinary

0400

0500

0600

0700

0800

0900

1000

1100

1200

1300

1400

1500

1600

1700

1900

2000

2100

2200

3000

4900

40

85

80

50

25

35

40

85

40

75

80

90

50

90

40

95

95

95

40

80

60

15

20

50

75

65

60

15

60

25

20

10

50

10

60

5

5

5

60

20

55

82

52

79

9

27

32

85

56

95

100

69

38

95

62

77

83

85

22

57

45

18

48

21

91

73

68

15

44

5

0

31

62

5

38

23

17

15

78

43

Source: Maas Companies Database

Analysis of Instructional Offerings

Table II-F outlines the productivity of the instructional divisions at Gavilan. For the 1998 fall semester, Gavilan offered a total of 463 net, active class sections that generated a total of 43,246 WSCH and 1,442 active, full-time equivalent students (FTES). The average WSCH per section was 93. The effective WSCH per student enrollment was 8.63.

Table II-F

Analysis of Instructional Offerings

5,014 Student Enrollment-Fall, 1998

Instructional Discipline

TOPS

CODE

# of Net Sections*

WSCH

Generated

FTES

Generated

Biological Science

0400

8

1,632

54.4

Business / Mgt.

0500

11

650

21.7

Communications

0600

18

1,360

45.3

Computer Info. Systems

0700

46

1,390

46.3

Education/PE

0800

31

3,672

122.4

Engineering/Tech

0900

17

2,261

75.4

Fine/Applied Arts

1000

33

3,344

111.5

Foreign Language

1100

11

1,299

43.3

Health Occupations

1200

11

1,267

42.2

Consumer Ed/Child Dev.

1300

17

1,154

38.5

Law

1400

4

162

5.4

Humanities

1500

84

10,871

362.4

Library Science

1600

3

33

1.1

Mathematics

1700

30

4,671

155.7

Physical Science

1900

8

1,279

42.6

Psychology

2000

8

1,046

34.9

Public Affairs/Services

2100

8

526

17.5

Social Science

2200

28

2,924

97.5

Commercial Services

3000

5

1,537

51.2

Interdisciplinary

4900

82

2,169

72.3

TOTAL

 

463*

43,246

 

Gavilan WSCH/Section

93.4

Statewide Average WSCH/Section

115

Source: Gavilan Office of Admissions, Gavilan Administration and Records & Maas Companies Databases; Analysis the Maas Companies

* Class sections were discounted for off-campus work experience, combined and open enrollment courses, and sections with zero attendance to arrive at an effective "net" number of class sections.

Projections for the Future Instructional Program

Using the best available data, the projections that follow provide a quantifiable answer to the question of what the instructional program of the future will look like as Gavilan moves toward a target enrollment of 8,000 students. The projections presented have taken into account the actual performance of each discipline over the past five years and melded this with input from faculty, staff, students, and 58 community college districts in California. Changes in the instructional delivery methods that are anticipated in the future have also been factored into these projections.

Growth in the instructional disciplines has been forecasted at varying rates. The increase of approximately 60% in enrollment growth over the next ten years, therefore, will not come as linear or relational in its application to each instructional discipline. External and internal factors, demographics, past performance, projected need, and curriculum balance have been taken into account. The projection is meant to serve as a model for the instructional program that will be required to meet a future enrollment of 8,000 students.

The following reference sources were used to arrive at these projections:

  1. 1998 Gavilan District Report 17 ASF/OGSF Summary and the Capacities Summary (an inventory of facilities that is recorded with the state Chancellor’s Office).
  2. 1999 Space Inventory and Facility Building Summary, conducted by the Maas Companies.
  3. The Weekly Student Contact Hours (WSCH) Comparison Report (published by the state Chancellor’s Office).
  4. Enrollment and performance data provided by Gavilan’s office of Admission and Records.
  5. The Maas Companies’ database that is comprised of information from 58 of the 72 community college districts within the state for which the Maas Companies has completed educational and facility master plans.

WSCH and FTES Projections for 6,500 Students

Table II-G provides a perspective for an enrollment of 6,500 students. The data projected suggests a greater emphasis on increasing the efficiency and productivity of the instructional program. At the time when 6,500 enrollment is achieved, active class sections are projected to be 583 and WSCH 59,018. WSCH generated per section would increase from the current 93 to 101. FTES are projected to be 3,935 with an overall WSCH per student enrollment of 9.07.

Table II-G

Gavilan Instructional Program

Projected for 6,500 Student Enrollment

Target Year 2005

Instructional Discipline

TOPS

CODE

# of "Net" Sections*

Calculated

WSCH

Projected

Annual FTES

Biological Science

0400

12

1,620

108.0

Business / Mgt.

0500

16

1,392

92.8

Communications

0600

21

2,058

137.2

Computer Info. Systems

0700

54

3,672

244.8

Education/PE

0800

39

4,251

283.4

Engineering/Tech

0900

10

1,650

110.0

Fine/Applied Arts

1000

38

4,104

273.6

Foreign Language

1100

13

1,534

102.3

Health Occupations

1200

13

1,547

103.1

Consumer Ed/Child Dev.

1300

19

1,786

119.1

Law

1400

0

0

0

Humanities

1500

95

11,020

734.7

Library Science

1600

0

0

0

Mathematics

1700

34

4,930

328.7

Physical Science

1900

15

1,965

131.0

Psychology

2000

11

1,375

91.7

Public Affairs/Services

2100

10

920

61.3

Social Science

2200

36

4,032

268.8

Commercial Services

3000

5

1,600

106.7

Interdisciplinary

4900

103

5,974

398.3

New or Re-engineered Progs**

 

39

3,588

239.2

TOTAL

 

583*

59,018

3,935

Source: Maas Companies Projections

* Class sections are projected on the basis of "net" number of sections. Excluded are off-campus work experience, combined and open enrollment courses, and sections with zero attendance.

** "New or Re-engineered Programs" are programs that are yet to be determined. They may be new programs/curricular offerings or existing programs/curricular offerings that the college has decided to re-engineer. As such, a TOPS code listing has not been assigned.

WSCH and FTES Projections for 8,000 Students

Table II-H provides a WSCH and FTES perspective for an enrollment of 8,000. Class sections are projected to reach 713 with WSCH of 73,344. WSCH per class section are projected to reach 103. A total of 4,890 FTES are forecasted with WSCH per student enrollment climbing to a level of 9.17.

Table II-H

Gavilan Instructional Program

Projection for 8,000 Student Enrollment

Target Year 2010

Instructional Discipline

TOPS

CODE

# of "Net" Sections

Calculated

WSCH

Estimated

FTES

Biological Science

0400

15

2,070

138.0

Business / Mgt.

0500

22

2,222

148.1

Communications

0600

24

2,616

174.4

Computer Info. Systems

0700

63

5,544

369.6

Education/PE

0800

48

5,328

355.2

Engineering/Tech

0900

14

2,408

160.5

Fine/Applied Arts

1000

45

5,040

336.0

Foreign Language

1100

16

1,984

132.3

Health Occupations

1200

15

1,995

133.0

Consumer Ed/Child Dev.

1300

21

2,226

148.4

Law

1400

0

0

0

Humanities

1500

104

12,272

818

Library Science

1600

0

0

0

Mathematics

1700

37

5,106

340.0

Physical Science

1900

19

2,375

158.3

Psychology

2000

13

1,794

119.6

Public Affairs/Services

2100

13

1,274

84.9

Social Science

2200

46

5,520

368.0

Commercial Services

3000

0

0

0

Interdisciplinary

4900

128

7,424

494.9

New or Re-engineered Progs**

 

70

6,146

409.7

TOTAL

 

713*

73,344

4,890

Source: Maas Companies Projections

* Class sections are projected on the basis of "net" number of sections. Excluded are off-campus work experience, combined and open enrollment courses, and sections with zero attendance.

** "New or Re-engineered Programs" are programs that are yet to be determined. They may be new programs/curricular offerings or existing programs/curricular offerings that the college has decided to re-engineer. As such, a TOPS code listing has not been assigned.

Current WSCH Lecture/Laboratory Breakdown

Table II-I provides a current breakdown, by instructional discipline, of lecture WSCH and laboratory WSCH for Gavilan. The 1998 fall semester is used as the baseline for comparison.

TABLE II-I

Gavilan Lecture and Laboratory WSCH

By Instructional Discipline

5,014 Students - Fall 1998

Instructional Discipline

TOPS

CODE

# of "Net" Sections*

Lecture WSCH

Laboratory

WSCH

Total

WSCH

Biological Science

0400

8

891.9

740.1

1,632.0

Business / Mgt.

0500

11

530.1

120.3

650.4

Communications

0600

18

702.5

657.1

1,359.6

Computer Info. Systems

0700

46

1,095.4

294.8

1,390.2

Education/PE

0800

31

380.2

3,292.1

3,672.3

Engineering/Tech

0900

17

616.6

1,644.5

2,261.1

Fine/Applied Arts

1000

33

1,080.1

2,263.7

3,343.8

Foreign Language

1100

11

1,102.4

196.9

1,299.3

Health Occupations

1200

11

708.2

558.7

1,266.9

Consumer Ed/Child Dev.

1300

17

1,096.5

57.0

1,153.5

Law

1400

4

162

0

162.0

Humanities

1500

84

7,446.9

3,423.9

1,0870.8

Library Science

1600

3

12.5

20.5

33.0

Mathematics

1700

30

4,450.0

220.7

4,670.7

Physical Science

1900

8

799.1

479.5

1,278.6

Psychology

2000

8

802.1

243.7

1,045.8

Public Affairs/Services

2100

8

438.4

87.8

526.2

Social Science

2200

28

2,485.7

438.7

2,924.4

Commercial Services

3000

5

333.3

1,203.3

1,536.6

Interdisciplinary

4900

82

1,231.8

937.2

2,169.0

TOTAL

 

463*

26,365.8

16,880.4

43,246.2

Source: Analysis, The Maas Companies

* Class sections are projected on the basis of "net" number of sections. Excluded are off-campus work experience, combined and open enrollment courses, and sections with zero attendance.

Lecture/Laboratory WSCH Projected for 6,500 Students

In Table II-J, a perspective is provided relative to WSCH ratios for lecture and laboratory at a point when a student enrollment of 6,500 is achieved. The projections are designed to move Gavilan closer to the statewide averages for lecture/laboratory WSCH ratios.

TABLE II-J

Projection of Lecture and Laboratory WSCH

By Instructional Discipline

6,500 Students –Target Year 2005

Instructional Discipline

TOPS

CODE

# of "Net" Sections*

Lecture WSCH

Laboratory

WSCH

Total

WSCH

Biological Science

0400

12

648.0

972.0

1,620

Business / Mgt.

0500

16

1,183.2

208.8

1,392

Communications

0600

21

1,646.4

411.6

2,058

Computer Info. Systems

0700

54

1,836.0

1,836.0

3,672

Education/PE

0800

39

1,062.8

3,188.3

4,251

Engineering/Tech

0900

10

577.5

1,072.5

1,650

Fine/Applied Arts

1000

38

1,641.6

2,462.4

4,104

Foreign Language

1100

13

1,303.9

230.1

1,534

Health Occupations

1200

13

618.8

928.2

1,547

Consumer Ed/Child Dev.

1300

19

1,339.5

446.5

1,786

Law

1400

0

0

0

0

Humanities

1500

95

9,918.0

1,102.0

11,020

Library Science

1600

0

0

0

0

Mathematics

1700

34

4,437.0

493.0

4,930

Physical Science

1900

15

786.0

1,179.0

1,965

Psychology

2000

11

1,306.3

68.8

1,375

Public Affairs/Services

2100

10

874.0

46.0

920

Social Science

2200

36

3,830.4

201.6

4,032

Commercial Services

3000

5

640.0

960.0

1,600

Interdisciplinary

4900

103

4,779.2

1,194.8

5,974

New or Reengineered Progs **

 

39

2,152.8

1,435.2

3,588

TOTAL

 

583*

40,581

18,437

59,018

Source: Maas Companies Projections

* Class sections are projected on the basis of "net" number of sections. Excluded are off-campus work experience, combined and open enrollment courses, and sections with zero attendance.

** "New or Re-engineered Programs" are programs that are yet to be determined. They may be new programs/curricular offerings or existing programs/curricular offerings that the college has decided to re-engineer. As such, a TOPS code listing has not been assigned. Lecture/Laboratory ratios have been determined using a 60% to 40% lecture/laboratory ratio.

Lecture/Laboratory WSCH Projected for 8,000 Students

Table II-K provides a lecture and laboratory WSCH projection for an enrollment of 8,000 students. Greater emphasis has been placed on matching efficiency and productivity with growth and expansion over the projected ten-year period.

TABLE II-K

Projection of Lecture and Laboratory WSCH

By Instructional Discipline

8,000 Students –Target Year 2010

Instructional Discipline

TOPS

CODE

# of "Net" Sections*

Lecture WSCH

Laboratory

WSCH

Total

WSCH

Biological Science

0400

15

828.0

1,242.0

2,070

Business / Mgt.

0500

22

1,887.7

333.3

2,222

Communications

0600

24

2,092.8

523.2

2,616

Computer Info. Systems

0700

63

2,772

2,772

5,544

Education/PE

0800

48

1,332

3,996

5,328

Engineering/Tech

0900

14

842.8

1,565.2

2,408

Fine/Applied Arts

1000

45

2,016.0

3,024.0

5,040

Foreign Language

1100

16

1,686.4

297.6

1,984

Health Occupations

1200

15

798.0

1,197.0

1,995

Consumer Ed/Child Dev.

1300

21

1,669.5

556.5

2,226

Law

1400

0

0

0

0

Humanities

1500

104

11,045.0

1,227.2

12,272

Library Science

1600

0

0

0

0

Mathematics

1700

37

4,595.0

510.6

5,106

Physical Science

1900

19

950.0

1,425.0

2,375

Psychology

2000

13

1,704.0

89.7

1,794

Public Affairs/Services

2100

13

1,210.0

63.7

1,274

Social Science

2200

46

5,939.2

1,484.8

7,424

Commercial Services

3000

0

0

0

0

Interdisciplinary

4900

128

6,932.2

1,740.8

8,704

New or Reengineered Progs **

 

70

3,687.6

2,458.4

6,146

TOTAL

 

713*

50,302

23,042

73,344

Source: Maas Companies Projections

* Class sections are projected on the basis of "net" number of sections. Excluded are off-campus work experience, combined and open enrollment courses, and sections with zero attendance.

** "New or Re-engineered Programs" are programs that are yet to be determined. They may be new programs/curricular offerings or existing programs/curricular offerings that the college has decided to re-engineer. As such, a TOPS code listing has not been assigned. Lecture/Laboratory ratios have been determined using a 60% to 40% lecture/laboratory ratio.

Determination of Space Capacity

When space needs are projected, a total square footage requirement is compared against current space holdings. This comparison results in a net space capacity. The following sections provide a definition of capacity, a listing and explanation of the utilization and planning standards used to determine capacity, and net space capacity in all categories of educational space for Gavilan College.

Facilities Inventory

The inventory of facilities is an important tool in planning and managing college campuses. The California Community Colleges Facilities Inventory Manual includes descriptive data on buildings and rooms for each college district. This information is essential for developing the annual five-year capital construction plan and for scheduling and controlling campus space. In addition, planning for new capital outlay construction projects, projecting future facilities, developing capital outlay and deferred maintenance budgets, and analyzing space utilization are tasks that rely heavily on the facilities inventory documents and procedures.

The Education Code mandates an annual inventory of all facilities in the college district. This document, the 2000 Gavilan Community College District Report 17 ASF/OGSF Summary and Capacities Summary, was used as the basis for the facility assessment. The facilities inventory, as stated, has been integrated into the current database and used for the projection of future building requirements at the college.

Existing and Future Space Capacity

By combining existing and future enrollment estimates with appropriate space use standards, space capacity for the current year or for future years can be developed. Space capacity is the direct relationship between the amount of space available, by type, which may be used to serve students, and the number of students participating in campus programs. Space capacity analysis typically includes the following types of spaces:

Table II-L

Standard Space Categories

Used For Campus Assessment

Classrooms

Lounge

Non-class laboratories

Bookstore

Teaching laboratories

Health services

Library/learning resources

Theatre

Offices

Meeting room

Audio visual, radio and television

(instructional media) facilities

Data processing

Teaching gym

Physical plant

Food service

Assembly/Exhibition

The space categories presented in Table II-L represent the majority of the total educational and general facility space on a typical community college campus. Space capacity analysis enables an institution to identify the types of space it needs and/or the types of space it holds in excess. The analysis of space capacity forms the core of the facilities plan.

Space Utilization and Planning Standards

To determine space capacity requirements for a college's enrollment, the enrollment itself, or an appropriate form thereof, is applied to a set of standards for each type of space.

Prescribed State Space Standards

Title 5 of the California Administrative Code (Sections 57000-57140) prescribes standards for the utilization and planning of most educational facilities in public community colleges. These standards, when applied to the total number of students served (or some variant thereof, e.g., weekly student contact hours), produce total capacity requirements that are expressed in assignable square feet (space available for assignment to occupants). The Title 5 space planning standards used to determine both existing and future capacity requirements are as follows:

  • Classrooms

Assignable square feet (ASF) per student station 15

Station utilization rate 66%

Average hours room used per week 53

  • Teaching Laboratories

ASF per student station (See Exhibit IV-D)

Station utilization rate 85%

Average hours room used per week 27.5

  • Offices, Office Service, Conference Rooms, and Reception Areas

ASF per FTE instructional staff 140

  • Library/Learning Resources Facilities

Base ASF allowance 3,795

ASF for first 3,000 DGE 3.83

ASF per 3,001 - 9,000 DGE 3.39

ASF per for more than 9,000 DGE 2.94

  • Instructional Media/AV, TV, Radio

Base ASF allowance 3,500

ASF per first 3,000 DGE 1.50

ASF per 3,001 - 9,000 DGE 0.75

ASF per for more than 9,000 DGE 0.25

Each component of these standards is mathematically combined with an appropriate form of enrollment to produce a total assignable square feet (ASF) capacity requirement for each category of space. The sum of these categories represents the total building requirement for the college.

Assignable Square Footage (ASF) Standard for College Laboratory Space

Listed below, in Table II-M, is the Title 5 state standard used to determine assignable square footage for laboratory space. The determination for assignable square footage for lecture is derived via mathematical calculation.

Table II-M

Assignable Square Feet (ASF) for Laboratory Space

Instructional Discipline

TOPS

CODE

ASF/Station

ASF/100 WSCH

Biological Science

0400

55

233

Business / Mgt.

0500

30

128

Communications

0600

50

214

Computer Info. Systems

0700

40

171

Education/PE

0800

75

321

Engineering/Tech

0900

75

321

Auto Mechanic

0947

200

856

Auto Technology

0948

75

556

Aviation Maintenance

0950

175

749

Fine/Applied Arts

1000

60

257

Foreign Language

1100

35

150

Health Occupations

1200

50

214

Consumer Ed/Child Dev.

1300

60

257

Law

1400

35

150

Humanities

1500

35

150

Library Science

1600

35

150

Mathematics

1700

35

150

Physical Science

1900

60

257

Psychology

2000

35

150

Public Affairs/Services

2100

50

214

Social Science

2200

35

150

Commercial Services

3000

50

214

Interdisciplinary

4900

60

257

Welding

5341

90

385

Source: Maas Companies - Calculations based on

California Code of Regulations Title 5, Chapter 8 Section 57028

Computation of the FTE Instructional Staff

The sample worksheet (Table II-N) must be completed by the district with the submission of the five-year capital construction plan. This worksheet must be updated and submitted by the college each subsequent year. For long-term planning purposes, this worksheet is used to project future staffing for the instructional program.

Table II-N

Worksheet for Computing FTE of Instructional Staff*

Category

Total Professional Instructional and Statutory Staff FTE

Non-Instructional Portion FTE

Net Total Statutory Staff FTE

Instructors

     

Counselors

     

Department Admin

     

Librarians

     

Instructional Admin

     

Totals

     

Source: Maas and Companies and Chancellor’s Office

*Please note that this chart must be completed prior to completing Five-Year Capital Construction Plan.

The five categories of full-time equivalent (FTE) staff are specified and defined as follows:

  1. Instructors: Included are the professional instructional staff for day, extended-day, and adult education, except those whose offices are located in an off campus location.
  2. Counselors: Includes the professional counseling staff, special programs coordinators, extended opportunity program coordinators, statutory, and Title 5 required staff.
  3. Department Administrators: Includes professional staff responsible for coordinating or supervising departmental activities. This category is dependent upon the organizational structure of the college but is generally defined as the department chair for an instructional or support service area.
  4. Librarians: Professional librarians and directors of media services.
  5. Institutional Administrators: Professional administrators with responsibilities covering the entire institution such as a president, vice president, deans, business managers, etc. This category generally covers all administrators above the department level.

Non-State Space Standards

The state provides standards for utilization and planning for more than 60% of all types of spaces on campus. Capacity estimates for those remaining spaces, representing approximately 40%, are based on a combination of factors including the size and/or nature of the institution. Standards for the remaining types of spaces are presented in Table II-O. These standards were determined based on a national study of space standards and discussions with colleagues in the California community colleges and the chancellor's office.

Table II-O

Assignable Square Footage for Non-State Standard Space Categories

Category of Space

Basis

ASF

Factor

Non-class Laboratory

0.095ASF per headcount student

0.095

Teaching Gym

Greater of 2.5 ASF per FTES or 35,000 ASF

2.5-35,000

Assembly/Exhibition

ASF Equal to Student Headcount

100%

Food Service

0.60 ASF per Student Headcount

0.60

Lounge

0.67 ASF per FTES

0.67

Bookstore

1,500 ASF plus 0.67 ASF per Student Headcount

0.75

Health Service

ASF Allowance

1,200

Meeting Room

0.333 ASF per Student Headcount

0.333

Childcare

Greater of 0.4 ASF per Headcount or 6,000 ASF (Also, See State Child Care Standards)

0.40 – 6,000

Data Processing

ASF Allowance

5,000

Physical Plant

ASF Allowance

5% of Total

All Other Space

ASF Allowance

2.5 % of Total

Source: Maas Companies & Chancellor’s Office

Methodology and Projections for Future Capacity;

The determination of future capacity requirements for Gavilan College is included in the following methodology:

  • Enrollment estimates, or the appropriate form thereof, were applied in combination with appropriate space planning standards (space planning standards were presented in the preceding pages) to result in a total space requirement in ASF by type of space.
  • The current space inventory for the college was subtracted from the total space requirements described above in step one to result in the net ASF need by type of space for the projected ten-year facilities plan.
  • The result, net assignable square footage by type of space for the ten-year cycle, was translated into the facility codes used by the state to evaluate and authenticate the space needs projections.

The quantifiable calculations for assignable square footage began with Table II-F, the credit instructional offerings and WSCH for the college for fall 1998. Tables II-G through II-K project the sections of class and WSCH that will be generated by each instructional discipline as the college achieves the projected enrollment of 8,000 students. The WSCH information generated becomes the basis for the projection of future facility requirements for the college.

Assignable Square Footage for 6,500 Students

Table II-P provides a projection for the assignable square footage required to meet lecture and laboratory space needs for an enrollment of 6,500 students.

TABLE II-P

Projection of Lecture and laboratory ASF for 6,500 Students

Target Year – 2005

Instructional Discipline

TOPS

CODE

# of Sections

Lecture ASF

Laboratory

ASF

Total

ASF

Biological Science

0400

12

278

2,265

2,543

Business / Mgt.

0500

16

508

267

775

Communications

0600

21

706

881

1,587

Computer Info. Systems

0700

54

788

3,140

3,927

Education/PE

0800

39

456

10,234

10,690

Engineering/Tech

0900

10

122

3,630

3,752

Fine/Applied Arts

1000

38

704

6328

7,033

Foreign Language

1100

13

559

345

905

Health Occupations

1200

13

265

1,986

2,252

Consumer Ed/Child Dev.

1300

19

575

1,148

1,722

Law

1400

0

0

0

0

Humanities

1500

95

4,255

1,653

5,908

Library Science

1600

0

0

0

0

Mathematics

1700

34

1,903

740

2,643

Physical Science

1900

15

337

3,030

3,367

Psychology

2000

11

560

103

664

Public Affairs/Services

2100

10

399

105

504

Social Science

2200

36

1,643

302

1,946

Commercial Services

3000

5

275

2,054

2,329

Interdisciplinary

4900

103

2,050

3,071

5,121

New/Re-eng.’ed Progs **

 

39

924

5,382

6,306

TOTAL

 

583*

17,308

46,664

63,972

Source: Maas Companies Projections

* Class sections are projected on the basis of "net" number of sections. Excluded are off-campus work experience, combined and open enrollment courses, and sections with zero attendance.

** "New or Re-engineered Programs" are programs that are yet to be determined. They may be new programs/curricular offerings or existing programs/curricular offerings that the college has decided to re-engineer. As such, a TOPS code listing has not been assigned. ASF has been determined using a factor of 375/100WSCH.

Assignable Square Footage for 8,000 Students

Table II-Q provides a projection for the assignable square footage required to meet lecture and laboratory space needs for an enrollment of 8,000 students.

Table II-Q

Projection of Lecture and Laboratory ASF for 8,000 Students

Target Year - 2010

Instructional Discipline

TOPS

CODE

# of Sections

Lecture ASF

Laboratory

ASF

Total

ASF

Biological Science

0400

15

355

2,894

3,249

Business / Mgt.

0500

22

810

427

1,237

Communications

0600

24

898

1,120

2,017

Computer Info. Systems

0700

63

1,189

4,740

5,959

Education/PE

0800

48

571

12,827

13,399

Engineering/Tech

0900

14

195

5,868

6,063

Fine/Applied Arts

1000

45

865

7,772

8,637

Foreign Language

1100

16

723

446

1,170

Health Occupations

1200

15

342

2,562

2,904

Consumer Ed/Child Dev.

1300

21

716

1,430

2,146

Law

1400

0

0

0

0

Humanities

1500

104

4,738

1,841

6,579

Library Science

1600

0

0

0

0

Mathematics

1700

37

1,971

766

2,737

Physical Science

1900

19

408

3,662

4,070

Psychology

2000

13

731

135

866

Public Affairs/Services

2100

13

519

136

656

Social Science

2200

46

2,250

414

2,664

Commercial Services

3000

0

0

0

0

Interdisciplinary

4900

128

2,548

3,816

6,364

New or Re-eng’d Progs**

 

70

1,582

9,219

10,801

TOTAL

 

713*

21,413

60,074

81,487

Source: Maas Companies Projections

* Class sections are projected on the basis of "net" number of sections. Excluded are off-campus work experience, combined and open enrollment courses, and sections with zero attendance.

** "New or Re-engineered Programs" are programs that are yet to be determined. They may be new programs/curricular offerings or existing programs/curricular offerings that the college has decided to re-engineer. As such, a TOPS code listing has not been assigned. ASF has been determined using a factor of 375/100WSCH.

Calculation of Net Assignable Square Footage (ASF) of Space for 8,000 Students:

Using data from the previous tables for calculating both prescribed state space standards and non-space state standards, Table 38 provides a net assessment for assignable square footage of all campus facilities to meet the needs of a student enrollment of 8,000. The data provided is formatted to be consistent with the state code for facilities. The forecast is based on a ten-year period with a target year of 2010.

Table II-R

Building Requirements For 8,000 Students

Target Year 2010

Space Category

Description

Current

Space Inventory

ASF for

8,000

Students

Additional ASF Needed

2010

000

All Other

0

0

0

100

Classroom

25,525

21,413

<-4,112>

210-230

Laboratory/Lab. Service

55,113

60,074

4,961

235-255

Non Class Lab./Service

644

2,035

1,391

300

Office/Conference

20,828

23,982

3,154

400

Library

17,829

32,325

14,496

520-525

Physical Education (Indoor)

19,085

35,000

15,915

530-535

Instructional Media (AV/TV)

6,707

11,750

5,043

540-555

Child Care, Clinic

2,411

6,000

3,589

580

Greenhouse

373

665

292

610-625

Assembly/Exhibition

13,427

8,000

<-5,427>

630-635

Food Service

10,488

4,800

<-5,688>

650-655

Lounge/Lounge Service

2,605

3,264

659

660-665

Bookstore

1,754

6,860

5,106

670-690

Meeting /Recreation

1,073

2,664

1,591

710-715

Data Processing/Comp

682

5,000

4,318

720-770

Physical Plant

4,217

10,052

5,835

800

Health Service

0

1,200

1,200

TOTAL

 

182,761

235,084

52,323

Source: Space Inventory and Report 17, Chancellor’s Office, California Community Colleges and Maas Companies calculations based on California Code of Regulations Title 5, Chapter 8 Section 57028

Facility Planning Components

The previous sections of this chapter have outlined the quantitative aspects of the present and future facility needs for Gavilan College. Using this information as a guide, the consultant met with the College’s Facility Master Planning Committee to review the physical condition of the current facilities and to develop a long-term plan for future facilities for the college. A summary of the key issues identified as part of the process and the recommended solutions are presented in the sections that follow. Back-up documentation including the Annual space Inventory, 5-Year Capital Construction Plan, 5-Year Scheduled Maintenance Plan and enrollment projects are included in the appendices.

In assessing the facilities at the college, a series of site planning components were identified. These components were as follows:

  • College Identity
  • Community Outreach
  • The Campus Architecture
  • Land Utilization
  • Facilities Which Support the College’s Instructional Program and Support Services
  • Scheduled Maintenance Issues

As noted previously, the initial buildings at Gavilan College are approximately 40 years old. Additional buildings were added in the 1970’s but it has only been the last two years that any new buildings have been added to the campus. With 147 acres of property, the campus has the physical space to accommodate the projected future growth.

College Identity -Does the architectural form and orientation of the college create a message to the surrounding community by establishing a campus identity?

    • There are two primary entrances to the College off Santa Teresa Boulevard. It is difficult to determine which entrance is the primary or "Front Door" of the College. The overall setting is excellent with the campus tucked into the base of the hills and the buildings arranged in a linear manner. The college makes a distinct architectural statement with the pre-cast stone exterior construction utilized throughout the campus. Open space and landscaped areas, including the golf course are prevalent around the perimeter of the campus.
    • A preliminary visual assessment of the buildings from any of the perimeter roads gives the impression that the college was master planned with one, agreed upon architectural style. There are only a limited number of buildings that do not reflect this architecture. The existence of portable structures detract from the overall architectural theme.
    • The campus signage is limited. This is an area that will need to be addressed as part of the refurbishment of the campus. Signs leading to parking areas are acceptable but pedestrian signs need to be improved.
    • Parking can generally be accomplished. New students to the campus may park in the visitor’s area and proceed directly to the Student Union building. Other student services are located in the library. As is the case with all colleges, parking is difficult at the beginning of each semester.
    • The campus has been constructed in an incremental manner. However, the main cluster of instructional buildings are in close proximity and are connected by wide walkways. Access for disabled persons continues to be an area that needs to be addressed.
    • Exterior lighting on the buildings, grounds and parking areas is fair but should be upgraded as part of the overall Facilities Master Plan.

Community Outreach -Are there plans to extend the educational programs and support services of the college throughout the college’s service area?

    • Gavilan College is a single college district. The district also includes centers in Morgan Hill, Gilroy and Hollister. Any future programs will be integrated within the current structure.
    • The college is presently pursuing partnerships and training programs with local businesses and industries. It is important that the activities result in public/private training programs with the local employers.

Campus Architecture -Does the current and planning architectural style of the campus offer students and employees a sense of order, consistency and an overall feeling that is conducive to learning?

    • As indicated in the previous section, the architecture of the college provides a positive impression. The size and design of the pre-cast stone and glass exteriors provides a strong exterior statement.
    • Upon detailed analysis, significant portions of the interior spaces do not support a modern, up-to-date learning environment. The existing classrooms and support service facilities do not provide a modern, flexible, technology-enhanced environment. Throughout the campus, the existing classrooms promote a traditional lecture or laboratory environment that offers the instructional staff limited flexibility. These are traditional lecture/laboratory spaces. These spaces do not support individualized learning or new technology systems.
    • Future remodel projects for the campus will need to address how the current, traditional space can be modified to reflect a more open, accessible learning environment which supports new teaching technology and individual learning processes.
    • The current space inventory for the college indicates there is currently an excess of lecture, office and laboratory space on the campus. When an enrollment of 8,000 students is achieved, classroom space continues to be in excess with a limited amount of demonstrated need for laboratory and office space. This means that future projects must address how the College can remodel existing lecture, laboratory, office, assembly and food service space to meet the needs of 8,000 students. Based on the square footage provided in the three buildings currently in planning or construction, the college will not be eligible for additional, new buildings in the foreseeable future.

Land Utilization -Is sufficient acreage available for the campus to expand to its proposed maximum build-out capacity? In responding to this question, the following items were mentioned:

    • As stated earlier, the campus contains 147 acres of property. The campus has sufficient acreage and building sites to accommodate the projected enrollment of 8,000 students. In reality, it has the capacity to accommodate at least 15,000 students. The college does not have a parking problem. Ultimately, the college should expand the present parking to provide between 1,600 and 2,000 parking spaces when an enrollment of 8,000 students is achieved.
    • Attention must be given to maintaining the building exteriors and campus landscaping. Attractive, open space is desirable on the campus. To date, the buildings and grounds of the college reflect good care and have served as the basis of a positive learning environment.
    • During peak class times, the present walkways and access to the parking areas are busy but accommodate the student flow.
    • There is a need to consider retrofitting and/or replacement of the infrastructure of the campus. Specific items to be addressed include roofs, communication/signal systems, electrical and mechanical systems and heating and air conditioning. Also, because of code changes, the college will need to address the fire prevention systems.

Facilities Which Support the College’s Instructional Program and Support Services

Does the current campus environment promote the delivery of instructional programs and support services or does it undermine the process of learning?

    • As noted previously, the college has an excess of lecture and laboratory space. A major concern is the updating of current space to accommodate the changes in technology and instructional delivery systems. The present facilities are traditional lecture/laboratory facilities and many do not provide the infrastructure (electrical, and communications, in particular) or flexibility needed in today’s changing instructional program needs. In addition, upon reviewing the class size data in relation to room capacities, the actual square footage in some rooms is far beyond that needed for the class size assigned to the room thus creating an immediate shortfall in facilities utilization. To a great extent, facilities are dictating the manner in which instructional programs and support services are provided. The concept of developing multi-functional instructional spaces that can be used for lecture, laboratory, demonstration or distance learning is critical. Such spaces can be classified as "Remodel for efficiency" projects and thus meet guidelines for state supported projects.
    • As part of the master planning process to address the additional needed ASF, it appears the best options for the state funded, 5-Year Capital Construction Plan would be:

a. Life/Safety Projects

b. Remodels for Efficiency

c. Remodel for Technology

    • As part of the Educational Master Plan--Unit Planning Guide process, faculty and staff identified the following facility concerns:
      1. The college needs to provide additional technology systems throughout the campus, a topic to be specifically addressed in the Technology Plan.
      2. The physical plant at Gavilan College is aging and there is a continuing need to provide human and financial support for increasing maintenance and operations issues.
      3. In the establishment of budget priorities, the college should continue to address the physical environment of the campus, including both building needs and grounds maintenance.
      4. The college should continue to give the highest priority to health and safety issues in the day-to-day maintenance of facilities.

Last modified: February 27, 2013
Gavilan College Red Diamond 5055 Santa Teresa Boulevard Red Diamond Gilroy, CA 95020 Red Diamond (408) 848-4800