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Standard IIA: Student Learning Programs and Services

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The institution offers high-quality instructional programs, student support services, and library and learning support services that facilitate and demonstrate the achievement of stated student learning outcomes. The institution provides an environment that supports learning, enhances student understanding and appreciation of diversity, and encourages personal and civic responsibility, as well as intellectual, aesthetic, and personal development for all of its students.

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STANDARD IIA: Student Learning Programs and Services

The institution offers high-quality instructional programs, student support services, and library and learning support services that facilitate and demonstrate the achievement of stated student learning outcomes. The institution provides an environment that supports learning, enhances student understanding and appreciation of diversity, and encourages personal and civic responsibility as well as intellectual, aesthetic, and personal development for all of its students.

Instructional Programs

The institution offers high-quality instructional programs in recognized and emerging fields of study that culminate in identified student outcomes leading to degrees, certificates, employment, or transfer to other higher education institutions or programs consistent with its mission. Instructional programs are systematically assessed in order to assure currency, improve teaching and learning strategies, and achieve stated student learning outcomes. The provisions of this standard are broadly applicable to all instructional activities offered in the name of the institution.

1.   The institution demonstrates that all instructional programs, regardless of location or means of delivery, address and meet the mission of the institution and uphold its integrity.

DESCRIPTION:

Gavilan College's Mission Statement sets forth the college's commitment to students and the community: "Gavilan College cultivates learning and personal growth in students of all backgrounds and abilities through innovative practices in both traditional and emerging learning environments; transfer pathways, career and technical education, developmental education, and support services prepare students for success in a dynamic and multicultural world. (2A.1)

The Gavilan College Vision is intricately interwoven with the broader Mission Statement.  It is built on a foundation of specific values and goals, listed in the Educational Master Plan:

VALUES:

  • An imaginative and nurturing community of learners, fostered through rigorous scholarship, creativity, and personal and professional development.
  • A college environment and social climate characterized by inclusiveness and mutual respect for all of our students, staff, and community.
  • Excellence in and promotion of comprehensive programs, services, and activities.
  • Partnerships that support the educational, economic and social development of the college and the communities we serve.

GOALS:

  • To be known for educational excellence
  • To demonstrate involved and responsive community leadership
  • To increase our accessibility
  • To encourage innovative instruction
  • To lead in the application of appropriate educational technology
  • To promote a harmonious learning and working environment

                   (2A.1, 2A.2)

Gavilan College's Educational Master Plan provides a framework to achieve the mission and values of the college while remaining flexible enough to change and be responsive to the community it serves.  Under the leadership of the Chief Instructional Officer, a comprehensive shared-governance process was followed to refresh the Educational Master Plan (EMP) in 2012 to continue to reflect the mission of Gavilan College. The Strategic Planning process ensures that all constituencies have an opportunity to help shape (and support) the mission of the college. The Program Planning process, updated in 2010, has made the Strategic Planning process more responsive and inclusive of individual faculty and programs, and has provided a more transparent institutional budgeting process.  In their Program Plans, faculty have a direct process to provide input to the Gavilan College Strategic Plan.  All efforts ensure consistency of quality and adherence to the college's mission.

Gavilan College strives to provide a high quality and broad range of services at all of its instructional sites, including online.  The implementation of the institutional goals and objectives at the satellite and distance learning sites, (in addition to provision of site-specific needs based upon differences in the student populations among the sites), is assessed through periodic surveys undertaken by the Gavilan College Office of Institutional Research (2A.3, 2A.4, 2A.5). The results of these surveys are discussed by the Departments Chairs and at shared governance committees. 

Gavilan College's objective for the satellite sites, based on research findings, has been to provide students in Morgan Hill and Hollister the opportunity to complete their General Education requirements at their local instructional site; additionally, Gavilan College continues its efforts to provide Student Services (particularly academic counseling) and support services such as tutoring and library services to students in Morgan Hill and Hollister and online. All Gavilan College students, regardless of their city of residence or the site at which they take classes, have access to the student support services provided at the main campus.

In order to ensure that institutional offerings support the mission, Gavilan College has developed an Educational Master Plan with internal and external environmental scans. An Integrated Planning Process drives the ongoing review and updating of all planning documents (2A.6).  Periodic review of all instructional and non-instructional programs through the Institutional Effectiveness Committee (IEC) ensures that all programs and services engage in self-study including qualitative and quantitative analysis (2A.7).

Through the IEC, all instructional programs at Gavilan College undergo a rigorous review process every three to five years (2A.8). The IEC reviews programs through a collaborative process, starting with a self-study submitted by each program under review.  The self-study is based on data including program learning outcomes, enrollment, FTES, student outcomes, staffing, and costs - and program representatives' responses to a series of prompts.  Program representatives must describe, and support with data, the program's effectiveness in meeting the Gavilan College mission and upholding standards of quality and integrity.  The self-study is reviewed by the IEC and is discussed with program representatives.  The result of this process is a set of recommendations from the IEC to the program and the institution.  Progress on these recommendations is evaluated two years after the program is initially reviewed.   The primary charge of the IEC is to ensure that both instructional and non-instructional programs adhere to, and support, the college's mission in a cost-effective and productive manner, regardless of location. The IEC's goal in reviewing each program is to evaluate how well the program functions in relation to its own objectives, the mission of the college, the college's institutional goals and priorities, the needs of the community, and plans for improvement (2A.9).

The IEC also reviews the satellite sites in Morgan Hill and Hollister, and the Distance Learning program.  As with other instructional and non-instructional programs, these programs submit self-studies that are reviewed by the committee, leading to a set of recommendations for improvement (2A.10).

In response to feedback from open forums with staff and faculty, the Integrated Planning Task Force (a subcommittee of the Strategic Planning Committee) substantially modified the program planning process in 2009. It found that the existing "Unit Plan" process had limited contribution to the Strategic Plan, was felt to be ineffective and cumbersome and had an unclear relationship to the institutional budgeting process.  The new Program Plans (which replaced the old "Unit Plans") are integrated with the Gavilan College Strategic Plan, program review, and student learning outcome assessment.  Program Plans are required by all instructional and student services programs and must include program objectives that are directly tied to the Strategic Plan, or recommend that a new Strategic Plan objective be included in the next annual revision.  Additionally, for a program to be funded through the institutional budget it must be included as a part of that area's Program Plan and a specific Budget Request made via that same process  (2A.11, 2A.12). The Integrated Planning Task Force meets annually to review and refine the integration of institutional processes, increase planning transparency and fully integrate the college's shared-governance processes (2A.6).

The Gavilan College Curriculum Committee ensures that instructional offerings contribute to the college mission and maintain a rigorous academic standard. The Curriculum Committee is a subcommittee of the Faculty Academic Senate (2A.13). 

Curricula are maintained and kept current through the curriculum process (2A.14, 2A.56).

Faculty review each course every four to five years and update:

  1. textbook and supplemental materials,
  2. applicability to program learning outcomes,
  3. student learning outcomes,
  4. grading criteria,
  5. content,
  6. applicability to General Education requirements,
  7. applicability to Institutional Learning Outcomes, and
  8. mode of delivery.

The Curriculum Committee also approves and updates all instructional programs, and is working on a defined cycle for programs such as exists for individual courses. Ideas for new programs may originate from a variety of sources including faculty, the Board of Trustees, vocational/technical advisory boards or legislation such as California Senate Bill 1440, which mandated the development of new "AA-T" and "AS-T" degrees for transfer to the California State University system. Gavilan College developed Associate of Arts degrees for Transfer (AA-T) in Communication Studies and Kinesiology, and Associate of Science degrees for Transfer (AS-T) in Administration of Justice and Math. The College is now seeking state Chancellor's Office approval for new AA-T degrees in Studio Art, Art History, and Theater Studies. In evaluating new programs, the college considers external surveys and studies, the college's mission statement, department discussions and the program review process. Gavilan College regularly conducts job market studies to examine the potential job growth in different disciplines (2A.15).

Gavilan College tracks student performance data, which is published online, presented to the Board of Trustees, and communicated through the shared governance process. For example, Gavilan College maintains the Gainful Employment Disclosure website (2A.16) to provide students information about certificate programs at the College, including the number of students completing each program.  Internal research is shared on the webpage of the Office of Institutional Research (2A.17).  The Cosmetology Degree Attainment Study in Spring 2011 (2A.18) showed that of those students who successfully completed COS 200 (Beginning Cosmetology) in the 07/08 academic year (40), 72.5 percent (29) of those students completed the program with either a degree or certificate by the end of the 09/10 academic year. The Accountability Report for Community Colleges (ARCC) (2A.19), prepared and posted online by the Chancellor's Office of the California Community Colleges, shows that for the last three years Gavilan College has performed better than the mean when compared against similar colleges. For the 09/10 academic year, the Student Progress and Achievement rate increased (8.2 percent) and was above the Peer Group average.  As in previous years, the successful course completion rate for credit/vocational courses increased and was the highest in the peer group.

EVALUATION:

Gavilan College meets Standard II (A)(1). 

PLAN:

None.

a.   The institution identifies and seeks to meet the varied educational needs of its students through programs consistent with their educational preparation and the diversity, demographics, and economy of its communities. The institution relies upon research and analysis to identify student learning needs and to assess progress toward achieving stated learning outcomes.

DESCRIPTION:

Gavilan College regularly conducts research to identify the learning needs of its students and the District's service area (2A.20, 2A.21).  Data from the Center for Excellence is used to profile and project the economic, demographic, and industry characteristics of the college's service area (2A.22).  These reports are shared with the Strategic Planning Committee and the overall college community and are included in the Gavilan College Fact Book (2A.15).

The Office of Institutional Research (OIR) has undertaken research on the proportion of students who test at different Basic Skills levels (2A.23) and regularly evaluates instructional and support programs using both formative and summative approaches (2A.24, 2A.25), (2A.26). The information generated in these evaluations helps programs responds to the needs of students.  The OIR also uses qualitative data collection methods to provide information that contributes to improvement in support programs.  For example, focus groups with students receiving supplemental instructional support revealed a need for more asynchronous assistance (2A.27).  This feedback led to the development of an online version of Supplemental Instructional sessions (2A.28).

All instructional and non-instructional programs conduct a self-study through the Institutional Effectiveness Committee (IEC) on a three to five year cycle.  The self-study includes both qualitative and quantitative data, and an analysis of program accomplishments, student needs or trends, and how the program will respond to those needs.  Recommendations from the IEC review are then incorporated into the annual Program Planning process.  For example, the Biology program found it needed more outdoor classroom space for students to see some of the concepts typically discussed in several highly popular courses.  This need was formed into a program plan proposal that was then included in a federal grant proposal for Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) and funded in 2011 (2A.57).

Beginning in 2006, Gavilan College initiated an institutionalized process for identifying and assessing Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs).  Faculty members write the SLOs for their academic programs and for each course.  The SLOs are then approved by the Curriculum Committee (2A.46) a faculty committee reporting to the Academic Senate.  Faculty members assess the SLOs on a rotating basis (2A.58) and discuss the findings at the program level (2A.59, 2A.60).  Student Learning Outcomes are linked to Program Learning Outcomes (PLO) and Institutional Learning Outcomes (ILO).  Gavilan College maintains a Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Reporting website which integrates the SLOs with the PLOs (2A.32).  Forms used by the Curriculum Committee (2A.14, 2A.55) also require that PLOs and ILOs be linked to each SLO.  Course outlines of record also contain this information. The SLO process ensures that instructors and program representatives collect, reflect upon, and use data to serve the needs of students. 

Student Success Reports are another source for information on students' attainment of their educational goals (2A.61).  These reports delineate indicators of institutional and subgroup successes, both short-term and long-term. They are widely distributed and discussed through the campus shared governance committees, and are shared throughout the year with the Gavilan College Board of Trustees.

EVALUATION:

Gavilan College meets Standard II (A)(1)(a).

PLAN:

None.

b.   The institution utilizes delivery systems and modes of instruction compatible with the objectives of the curriculum and appropriate to the current and future needs of its students.

DESCRIPTION:

The Educational Master Plan, updated in 2012 (2A.2), includes data and analysis to predict upcoming changes in Gavilan College's student population and the communities it serves. One of the key areas listed in the Education Master Plan is a commitment to a personalized learning model, through which students' individualized needs as learners are met, and students are provided with the personalized support needed to build their skills and succeed.  The 2011 award of a Title V grant has enabled Gavilan College to create a Student Success Center to provide a welcoming atmosphere with linkages to campus resources. It is expected that instructional delivery will change significantly over the next decade to accommodate the variety of student learning styles and needs. For example, the Educational Master Plan projects that computer technology will be increasingly integrated across the curriculum, and states that learning outcomes will guide teaching. Instructional delivery will change as teaching methodology adapts to new requirements for student learning (2A.2). In the last decade Gavilan College has expanded both existing traditional systems and new modes of instruction such as online instruction, technology-mediated learning, technology-enhanced instruction, and learning communities, while implementing new programs such as Supplemental Instruction and service learning. Gavilan College has also improved the traditional lecture, laboratory, and independent study delivery formats through redesigned classrooms, block scheduling, and other innovations.

When non-traditional delivery systems and modes of instruction are proposed for a course, the course outline, created by department faculty and approved by departments and area deans, is sent to the Curriculum Committee for consideration. Faculty members provide a detailed listing of course objectives and content for both new course proposals and proposed modifications to existing courses. The Curriculum Committee considers all aspects of each proposal including the appropriateness of the delivery system and modes of instruction. A link to the California Community Colleges Distance Education Regulations and Guidelines exists on the Curriculum Committee web page to provide guidance to faculty constructing new or revised course outlines (2A.13). In addition, the Distance Education/Technology committee, composed of faculty, administrators, and staff, regularly meets to develop and update guidelines and best practices for distance education. The Gavilan College Distance Learning Course Outline Addendum (2A.21) has been recently updated. Resources for distance education and online teaching are made available to faculty on the Teaching and Learning Resource Center website (2A.62).

Course outlines are updated on a schedule, each one every four to five years. The current status of each course is displayed on the curriculum website (2A.6). At the time of a course update, the department faculty evaluates the effectiveness of the delivery methods used in their courses and makes modifications as necessary. Delivery methods for courses are indirectly evaluated during the instructor evaluation process (2A.9). A voluntary survey, "Evaluating Your Online Class," is provided to students taking online classes (2A.22). This survey addresses technical aspects of each class, specific aspects of the class, and the student's comparison of the online format with face-to-face classes. Students in learning communities also complete satisfaction surveys (2A.23).

Deans and department faculty have frequent dialogues about delivery systems and modes of instruction, particularly about the suitability of courses for distance learning. For departments favoring the use of distance education as a delivery method, discussions occur at the Curriculum Committee as part of the approval process.  Similar discussions have occurred regarding self-paced computer-assisted instruction in basic mathematics (2A.25). Whereas these dialogues are department-driven, the dialogues related to learning communities have usually involved faculty from two or more departments before coming to the Curriculum Committee (2A.25). The Institutional Effectiveness Committee (IEC) also evaluates programs on a three to five year cycle, and reviews the integration of distance education into programs where relevant.

In order to improve cross-functional dialogue, the college established the Learning Council (LC).  The LC has representatives from all segments of the campus community including strong representation from students.  The mission of the LC is: "The Learning Council is a collaborative, cross-disciplinary forum that uses research, dialogue, recommendations, action, and evaluation to improve college conditions for student learning, growth, and success" (2A.153).  This group of staff, faculty, administrators, and students works to develop solutions both inside and outside of the classroom.  The LC has incubated ideas that have developed into veterans' services, student ambassadors, and habits of mind.  

Through the 2004 bond measure, Measure E, Gavilan College has upgraded classroom technology in a majority of the classrooms on campus. The satellite campuses in Hollister and Morgan Hill are also equipped with computers, projectors, internet access, and other instructional technology. Gavilan College has also expanded online curriculum over the past few years. One hundred and eighty-seven courses have been approved for distance education delivery including both fully online course sections and hybrid course sections, which include elements of both online and face-to-face instruction. From fall 2010 to fall 2011 there was a 50 percent increase in the number of students participating in distance education. Many of the traditional sections also have an online interface: in fall 2012, 200 face-to-face courses included course materials on iLearn (2A.65) and many others had online materials posted at the instructors' web sites.  All instructors have access to an online "Moodle shell" for each of the classes they are teaching. An increasing number of faculty have begun to utilize these shells to supplement instruction and improve communication with students. 

Faculty can learn about the instructional technology and new instructional methods and modes of delivery at the Gavilan College Teaching and Learning Center (TLC) (2A.62). The TLC provides faculty and staff with both face-to-face and online training modules for using technology in the classroom or for distance education, including podcasts, video, and social media. The resource center provides computers and other technology for faculty as well as a space for faculty to interact and engage in dialogue. The TLC conducts at least 10-12 in-house workshops per semester, 10 webinars, and one-on-one training by appointment or on a drop-in basis (2A.63). The TLC averages about 40 one-on-one appointments per week in addition to email and phone support. 

The Service Learning Program works with over 30 nonprofit and public agencies in the communities that the College serves, offering students opportunities to investigate and conduct research within their communities (2A.64). Gavilan College offers 8-12 Service Learning classes each semester, enrolling hundreds of students. Over 25 instructors have been trained to teach service learning in their classes and a broad range of disciplines have integrated service learning in their curriculum – sociology, anthropology, archeology, history, political science, biology/ecology, business, ESL, communication, and English.

Learning Communities, through which faculty from different disciplines link their classes' theme and content, and students enroll in both linked classes, are another innovative teaching strategy regularly employed at Gavilan. Learning Communities enable students to integrate their learning across disciplines.

To foster an interdisciplinary approach to teaching and learning, new interdisciplinary majors and programs have been developed, including AA degrees in community studies and global studies. Currently, an environmental studies degree is in development that will include courses in green technologies.

Another successful and responsive instructional modality is Supplemental Instruction (SI), which is being used in math, biology, English, history, and anthropology courses. Through SI, Peer Leaders (students who have completed the course with a high grade) facilitate study-sessions that integrate content and learning skills.  SI leaders are trained and supervised throughout the semester (2A.66).

EVALUATION:

Gavilan College meets Standard II (A)(1)(b)

PLAN:

None.

c.   The institution identifies student learning outcomes for courses, programs, certificates, and degrees; assesses student achievement of those outcomes' and uses assessment results to make improvements.

DESCRIPTION:

Since the last accreditation visit, the College has conducted considerable training and support to advance the College's identification and assessment of Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs). In spring 2008 and fall 2009, the College brought in an outside SLO expert to conduct staff development day presentations and working sessions with faculty.  This work was followed up by additional trainings and support sessions conducted by the Gavilan College SLO Coordinator.  An additional staff development day work session was conducted in fall 2010.  The College maintains a website, which has information and resources for both instructional and non-instructional SLO support (http://www.gavilan.edu/research/lo/).  The trainings along with the support provided have helped the College move forward in its assessment and use of SLO data. 

Gavilan College has identified Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) for all active courses.  SLOs are included in course syllabi (2A.29) and deans review course syllabi at the beginning of each semester to verify these critical elements are included. Assessment of student learning outcomes in active courses is an ongoing process and many courses have been assessed more than once. Student learning outcomes were created by faculty and taken through a rigorous approval process first by department chairs, then by academic deans, then by the Curriculum Committee, then by the vice president of instruction, and finally by the Board of Trustees to ensure that curriculum and SLOs all adhere to the academic rigor of an institution of higher education. Assessment mechanisms are included as part of the curriculum and include written and oral exams, oral reports, role-playing, projects, performances, demonstrations, etc. Successful completion of assessment measures ensures that students have achieved the intended learning objective. These results are validated by studies on student success, retention, and persistence (2A.16).

Instructional program learning outcomes have been written for all degree and certificate programs. These program-level SLOs are listed in the catalog and most are listed on the SLO assessment reporting web-site (2A.131).  Program learning outcomes are assessed for most programs by the departments in which the programs are housed. All Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs) and the strategies for achieving them are created and identified by faculty in each discipline and approved by the Curriculum Committee (2A.13).

Course SLOs are aligned with program learning outcomes through the above curriculum review process.  Each course lists which institutional, general education, and program learning outcomes are most closely aligned with the course SLOs (2A.14).  This alignment is also occurring through the SLO assessment reporting site (2A.132).   

Each course and program is required to report its assessment work using an online SLO reporting system.  The reporting system allows a user to select a course or program and the year that the assessment data was collected (2A.134).  The user reports the outcome, the assessment tool used to collect the data, the assessment results, and how the assessment results were used.  At the course level, the SLO is also aligned with the appropriate program-level outcome(s).  A reporting function on this same site allows the user to view when and by whom the last assessment was reported for all of the courses and programs on record.  As a part of the curriculum update process, each course and program is required to regularly assess course and program SLOs (2A.135). 

In some cases, the results from the assessment reporting site are supplemented by additional reports that provide greater detail.  For example, the tutoring center survey or the English portfolio report is available online through the institutional research site and provides greater detail regarding the assessment and results (2A.136, 2A.137). 

Assessment of student learning outcomes in active courses is an ongoing process and many courses have been assessed more than once (2A.138). Many disciplines, such as math, kinesiology, and English as a Second Language have evaluated all course level SLOs as well as PLOs and almost all other disciplines are near complete assessment. According to the College Status Report on Student Learning Outcomes Implementation, completed in May 2012 (2A.31), 100 percent of all courses have defined learning outcomes and 68 percent of these courses are engaged in ongoing assessment of learning outcomes (2A.138). Approximately 30 percent of the courses that have yet to be assessed are work experience, independent study, or new courses that have not yet been offered.  Of the 96 degrees, certificates, and programs offered at Gavilan, 100 percent have defined Program Learning Outcomes, with 45 percent conducting ongoing assessment.  

Program learning outcomes were assessed for the Liberal Arts and General Education programs through the implementation of a student survey (2A.139).  These findings were widely shared and discussed across campus (2A.140).  Additionally, a program review for GE and Liberal Arts degrees was conducted during the 2011-2012 academic year.  This review more closely examined data and the course composition of these programs (2A.29). 

As assessment data is collected as a part of this campus-wide system, it is reflected upon and used to promote improvement.   These modifications are documented as a part of the online reporting system for both courses (2A.141, 2A.142) and programs (2A.143, 2A.144).  Individual departments and instructors have also used SLO and course success data to advance campus-wide developments.  For example, as a result of the gaps identified by SLOs (2A.145), the ESL, English and Math departments have completed the screening and placement preparation to implement Accuplacer in spring 2013. While not all assessments lead to modifications, assessment, reflection, and documentation is occurring across the College.  

Outcome data is periodically shared in campus governance committees, specifically the Curriculum Committee, the Learning Council, the President's Council, the Academic Senate and the Department Chairs. Data is regularly presented from the Office of Institutional Research and time is provided for discussion regarding the impact of assessments on teaching and learning (2A.146, 2A.147).  In 2009, a series of SLO roundtable discussions were coordinated by a faculty member, who subsequently received a Promising Outcome Work and Exemplary Research Award (POWER) during the annual Student Success Conference for her work in guiding the SLO assessment dialogue at Gavilan College (2A.33). 

As the result of a college-wide gap analysis, a cross-disciplinary group was established to conduct dialogue and planning around student learning.  The Learning Council has repeatedly used data and information to discuss and develop interventions (2A.148).  As a result of the Learning Council, the shift over the past two years has been evident: from a community of teaching to a community of learning.  The Teaching and Learning Center, as well as the Student Success Center have been established on campus as a result of this shift.  These developments have been influenced by the ubiquity of SLO and other data (2A.149).  

As part of the Gavilan College Integrated Planning Model, each discipline has also constructed program plans (2A.5) that are reviewed and updated annually.  As a part of this process, individual programs are encouraged to use SLO data to inform their program plan objectives and corresponding budget requests.  These objectives and requests are assigned a ranked score by deans, vice presidents, the budget committee, and the President's Council. These ranking are based on a rubric, which includes SLO data support as one of the ranking criteria (2A.150). 

The program review process also incorporates program learning outcome data.  Each program undergoing review is required to present the status of the course-level assessment in its program area.  Additionally, the program is required to report the assessment results for the program-level SLOs.  This and other program review data culminates in recommendations developed in collaboration with the Institutional Effectiveness Committee.  These recommendations are the basis for program plan objectives and progress and improvement on both recommendations and objectives are monitored and tracked (2A.151, 2A.152). 

EVALUATION:

Gavilan College does not meet Standard II (A)(1)(c), as not all program learning outcomes have been assessed. While many programs are actively assessing program-level SLOs, others have yet to conduct this work. 

PLAN:

  • Support programs in assessing program-level SLOs through a Fall 2013 with a goal of full compliance by Spring 2014.

2.   The institution assures the quality and improvement of all instructional courses and programs offered in the name of the institution, including collegiate, developmental, and pre-collegiate courses and programs, continuing and community education, study abroad, short-term training courses and programs, programs for international students, and contract or other special programs, regardless of type of credit awarded, delivery mode, or location.

DESCRIPTION:

Through the Strategic Planning process in general, and, more specifically, through the rigorous evaluation and approval processes evident in the Curriculum Committee and the Institutional Effectiveness Committee  (IEC), Gavilan College ensures that the courses and programs it offers meet higher education standards and are responsive to the needs of the community served.

The criteria and process that Gavilan College uses in determining what courses and programs to offer is two-fold: First, through community surveys, community advisory boards, and internal discussion, proposals are made to the various shared-governance institutional committees for further discussion and recommendation.  Second, proposals are shared and discussed through the shared governance process including department meetings, the Academic Senate, the Department Chairs committee, and subsequently to the President's Council for a recommendation to the president and eventual recommendation to the Gavilan College Board of Trustees.

As a result of this shared-governance process, the college offers pre-collegiate (basic skills) courses in English, Math and English as a Second Language, a wide range of community education courses (2A.38), a study abroad opportunity through the Spanish program with study in Sevilla, Spain and Zacatecas, Mexico and short-term training courses in information systems and television production.

Once instructional courses and programs have been identified and approved, Gavilan College has two mechanisms to ensure that these instructional courses and programs are of high quality.  First, the Curriculum Committee has a rigorous process to evaluate and approve all instructional courses and programs for further approval by the college's board of trustees.  The work that the Curriculum Committee does is consistent with the requirements set forth by the California Community College Chancellor's (CCC) office (2A.36). For example, the Curriculum Committee determines the appropriate credit type for each course under advisement of the faculty experts developing the course curriculum (2A.14). The delivery mode for courses is similarly developed with added support from the Distance Education (DE) Coordinator and following the requirements set forth in the online education form (2A.37) that is completed by faculty members and approved by the Curriculum committee in order to offer a course online. Second, Gavilan College's Institutional Effectiveness Committee  (IEC) reviews each program every three to five years through an extensive review process (2A.7).  Upon completing their review of a program they make institutional recommendations for program improvement, thus ensuring that the program is meeting higher education standards and is supporting the institutional mission.  The review process includes a mid-term report for each program to report on actions taken based upon the recommendations of the last review. These processes are employed with both main campus and off-site courses. 

The Community Education program offers a variety of courses with flexible formats that focus on students not served by credit/noncredit programs (2A.38). For example Community Education offers classes in Pharmacy Technician, Veterinary Assistant, water industry training, motorcycle driving, cooking and a variety of online classes such as computing, eMarketing and leadership. Students can enroll in programs for continuing education purposes that refresh or enhance skills for the workplace or for personal enrichment. Community Education offers online courses and has worked carefully to fill specialized niches that do not overlap with credit instruction. Contract Education provides training for specific organizations meeting the needs of their employees. Community and contract education courses are evaluated on the basis of student enjoyment and enrollment, as well as written evaluation instruments for every class, each semester. If the evaluation or any other feedback indicates a problem, the instructor is contacted for feedback and is observed in the classroom.

EVALUATION:

Gavilan College meets Standard II (A)(2).

PLAN:

None.

a.   The institution uses established procedures to design, identify learning outcomes for, approve, administer, deliver, and evaluate courses and programs.  The institution recognizes the central role of its faculty for establishing quality and improving instructional courses and programs.

DESCRIPTION:

The curricular development process is faculty-driven through the Curriculum Committee and the Academic Senate. Faculty members are responsible for developing and updating all curricular courses and programs/certificates.  In recent years Gavilan College has increased the extent to which SLOs are tied to curricular development and improvement.  Beginning with the institutional introduction of SLOs in 2006 (2A.39), Gavilan College has made steady progress in developing course level student learning outcomes and integrating them into all official course outlines, and then assessing all course level learning outcomes (2A.31).  Gavilan College is now developing a process whereby the results of SLO assessment are used to inform both the modification of course outlines, and the exploration of different teaching approaches that may best encourage the achievement of SLOs.

The process for approving courses and programs is that of the Curriculum Committee. That Gavilan College's curricular processes are effective is evidenced by the high percentage of courses/programs that have been articulated with 4-year colleges and universities and the number of programs approved by the Chancellor's office (2A.40, 2A.41).  To maintain this high level of quality, the Curriculum Committee reviews each course every four to five years. The results of these evaluations are often modifications to course content and delivery methods and recommendations for program improvement.

Gavilan College's courses are regularly improved through the evaluation process.  Course outlines are updated to include current textbook references. Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs), Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs), General Education Learning Outcomes (GELOs) and Institutional Learning Outcomes (ILOs) are updated and modified to ensure that they address the college's mission statement and that they are measurable. To date, each approved course and program has documented and aligned learning outcomes. Where appropriate, courses are modified to include different delivery modes (such as online courses and hybrid courses) (2A.42). Programs have similarly been improved: Some have been updated to better reflect articulation with 4-year universities (2A.43); Others have been updated in response to legislative requirements such as the Transfer Model Curriculum and transfer degrees required by SB 1440. Where indicated, courses have been modified to better serve the needs of the students in attaining their goals of earning degrees and certificates or transferring (2A.44).

Gavilan College has developed an extensive program review process to evaluate and improve instructional and non-instructional programs.  Each program is systematically reviewed on a cycle of three to five years.  Program staff and faculty complete a self-study, which includes reflection upon multiple data elements, to highlight progress since the last review.  The self-study also outlines some of the challenges the program faces and describes plans to address these challenges (2A.154).  The Institutional Effectiveness Committee, with multiple faculty representatives, reviews each submission and works with the programs to develop recommendations for improvement.  Progress on these recommendations is checked two years after the review.  This process has led to a variety of program improvements.  For example, the English status check revealed curriculum, staffing, and pedagogical changes in response to program review recommendations (2A.151).  

EVALUATION:

Gavilan College meets Standard II (A)(2) (a).

PLAN:

None.

b.   The institution relies on faculty expertise and the assistance of advisory committees when appropriate to identify competency levels and measurable student learning outcomes for courses, certificates, programs including general and vocational education, and degrees.  The institution regularly assesses student progress towards achieving those outcomes.

DESCRIPTION:

Student learning outcomes and program learning outcomes are written by faculty and are evaluated for success by faculty in each discipline.  The faculty-led curriculum committee reviews both course level SLOs and program level PLOs on a regular basis, informed by ongoing research on student success at the program and institutional level by the Gavilan College Office of Institutional Research. Evidence of this assessment is reported on the college's SLO assessment reporting site.

Student learning outcomes (SLOs) are listed in each course outline approved by the curriculum committee and instructors publish SLOs in their course syllabi each semester. Program level learning outcomes are printed in the Gavilan College Catalog (2A.45).

Student learning outcomes (SLOs) are written by lead faculty in each discipline, program and course and are evaluated for success in student learning through ongoing evaluation of student learning outcomes. The faculty-led curriculum committee evaluates SLOs for both new courses and updated courses.  Shared governance committees, the Institutional Effectiveness Committee (IEC) and Academic Senate, are also faculty led and can inform the development of course and program level outcomes.  Career and Technical Education programs, such as Cosmetology, Aviation, and Child Development, utilize advisory committees to help develop SLOs for courses and PLOs for programs.

Student learning outcomes are evaluated at the course and program level on a regular basis and are compared to the overall success rates of students in courses and programs (2A.138, 2A.155). Programs such as English and ESL have developed a holistically scored evaluation for courses and programs, which contributes to dialogue around curriculum and pedagogical improvements. 

EVALUATION:

Gavilan College meets Standard II (A)(2) (b).

PLAN:

None.

c.   High-quality instruction and appropriate breadth, depth, rigor, sequencing, time to completion, and synthesis of learning characterize all programs.

DESCRIPTION:

Instruction is evaluated through full-time and part-time faculty evaluations and through the use of student learning outcomes.  Discussion at department meetings and dialogue at department chair meetings, curriculum meetings, the Academic Senate and the Institutional Effectiveness Committee ensures that high-quality instruction and appropriate breadth, depth, rigor, sequencing, time to completion, and synthesis of learning characterize Gavilan's courses and programs.

The quality of instruction is demonstrated at multiple levels. Classroom instruction is evaluated through full-time and part-time faculty evaluation. Instruction is evaluated by administration and faculty-peers through in class observation and student evaluation of instruction through surveys that capture qualitative and quantitative data. An online survey is administered for distance education students. Instructors are given these evaluations to assist them in improving their delivery methods and in-class instruction.

Courses are evaluated for success in student learning through ongoing evaluation of student learning outcomes. The Institutional Effectiveness Committee (IEC) reviews instructional programs every three to five years and includes a review of data including program learning outcomes, which have been established at the department level for all programs offering a degree or certificate. Program breadth and depth, rigor, sequencing, time to completion, and synthesis of learning are examined, and the IEC recommends changes such as development of a new instructional models (2A.151).  Progress on these recommendations is tracked over time.  

Dialogue on instructional quality occurs at multiple levels. Discussion begins at the program level among program faculty regarding the goals of each program and how to achieve these goals in the classroom, the department, and the College. Dialogue continues in department meetings regarding the development, updating, and class offerings for programs. At the institutional level, dialogue on programs occurs in department chair meetings, Curriculum Committee, Institutional Effectiveness Committee (IEC), Academic Senate and strategic planning meetings. The College also has a cross-disciplinary group, the Learning Council, that conducts wide-ranging dialogue on how to improve student success.

Gavilan College relies on the experience and expertise of faculty to determine the criteria with which to evaluate programs. The college faculty is consulted at multiple levels to establish and implement criteria for program development, evaluation, and revision. Faculty develops and implements criteria in their programs through course development and updating, which is evaluated by the faculty-driven curriculum committee (a sub-committee of the Academic Senate) (2A.46).  In addition, department chairs regularly assess the sequencing of courses in the schedule to ensure certificate and degree completion. Programs are evaluated on a regular basis through program learning outcomes assessment, which addresses the breadth, depth, rigor, sequencing, time to completion, and synthesis of learning in each program. Program criteria are discussed and analyzed through the Institutional Effectiveness Committee (IEC).

Faculty plays a central role in developing the criteria for program evaluation at all levels. Courses and programs are evaluated regarding their pre-collegiate and/or collegiate level through the faculty driven committees such as the Academic Senate, Curriculum Committee, and through the work of the articulation officer.  The articulation process ensures that Gavilan College courses are in alignment with equivalent courses at other schools. All courses and programs are submitted to the California State Chancellors Office for approval.

EVALUATION:

Gavilan College meets Standard II (A)(2) (c).

PLAN:

None.

d.   The institution uses delivery modes and teaching methodologies that reflect the diverse needs and learning styles of its students.

DESCRIPTION:

Gavilan College instruction includes a variety of delivery modes and teaching strategies to meet the needs and differing learning styles of students.

Many faculty members use a Learning Style Inventory as a part of their classes to determine the learning styles of their students. This tool identifies each student's learning style and provides examples of skills the students can use to help them succeed.  This information was presented at a learning styles workshop on Staff Development Day, Spring 2010 (2A.47).  The Disability Resource Center, the MESA program, communication classes and guidance classes also provide assessment of student learning styles.  Students use learning style assessments to develop self-knowledge and seek in-class and out-of-class instructional support that meets their needs.   Technology is used to assist students with their learning through a course management software system called Moodle, accessed by students at iLearn.gavilan.edu (2A.48).

Through a strategy of a mixture of student-centered pedagogies, the college is working to address the needs and learning styles of its students.  Faculty attend conferences and workshops that focus on student success, including those provided by the California Community College League and the statewide Research and Planning Group.

Multiple departments have investigated their approach to student learning. For example, the social science department is considering the impact of reducing class size to allow for more learning centered activities.  In the natural sciences department, pre-algebra curriculum has been revised to provide more class hours, and elementary algebra instructors require that students get tutoring.  In addition, curriculum changes have been made that give students the option of taking algebra courses in one semester or an alternative option that offers the course over two semesters.

Federal Title V funding has provided the faculty with the opportunity to research and develop contextualized teaching and learning principles and integrate project-based learning into a variety of courses.  Contextualized teaching and learning principles engage students in active learning while assisting them to make meaning out of the information they are obtaining.  Contextualized instruction links the learning of foundational skills with academic or occupational context by focusing teaching and learning squarely on concrete applications in a specific context that is of interest to the student.  Project based learning engages students in course-relevant activities as an avenue of authentic learning.  For example, Gavilan College's archeology students are experiencing an actual "dig" through project based learning, and several outdoor environmental science classrooms are being developed through a federal Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) grant.

Faculty and staff have discussed learning styles and teaching pedagogy at department meetings (2A.49) and department chair meetings (2A.50).  A staff development day workshop on learning styles was presented in the spring 2010 (2A.51). A PowerPoint presentation was developed by several instructors called Learning: Styles, Strategies, and Outcomes that was emailed to everyone for their use in the spring of 2010 (2A.52). It has since been updated and was redistributed campus wide the end of spring 2012 semester.  (2A.53).

In fall 2011 the college established a Student Success Center with funding provided by a federal Title V grant.  The center staff includes an activity director, student success coordinator, program assistant, two student success counselors, and an early alert counselor. Workshops have been offered to aid students, including one called "Conquering Math and English – Study according to your Learning Styles" (2A.54). 

Focused Inquirer Groups (FIG) and Faculty Learning Communities (FLC) have been established to research what other colleges and individuals are doing and to brainstorm instructional strategies. In fall 2011 the following topics were studied: using technology in education, First Year Experience (FYE), contextualized learning and accelerated learning.  Six instructors were involved in this project.  In spring 2012 Reading Across the Curriculum was added to the list.

The College utilizes a variety of delivery formats and teaching methods to meet the learning styles of its students.  Discussions at both department and department chair meetings have provided an avenue for information sharing on student learning styles and various delivery formats.  Staff development day workshops and a desire to share information across campus have also been a benefit.  Research on the First Year Experience and Supplemental Instruction has provided a foundation for building success.

Students are becoming more aware of their personal learning style through learning style inventories administered by instructors, the DRC, in guidance classes, workshops and through the newly established Student Success Center.  This knowledge provides them the opportunity to select the delivery format that best fits their learning style. 

Technology is used to assist both instructors and students.  Workshops as well as one-on-one training in the staff resource center is readily available to all instructors and staff who want to utilize various delivery modes and teaching methodologies and students have the opportunity to select courses offered in a variety of delivery formats.

As courses are developed and updated the information on the curriculum forms requires the originator to indicate how students are assessed (2A.14, 2A.55).  In order for a course to be approved it must include multiple means of assessment.  The departments generally determine the delivery modes.  Some departments offer courses in a variety of delivery modes therefore providing the students with the opportunity to select what works best for them.  Classes are offered in a variety of delivery modes, including distance education, technologically enhanced instruction, project based service learning, and learning communities. Supplemental instruction and academic excellence workshops support instruction in math, science, English, and other subjects.

The Course Outline of Record (COR) indicates which teaching methodologies have been selected for a particular class (2A.69, 2A.70).  A review of these indicates that lecture, discussion, demonstration, small groups, guided practice, PowerPoint presentations, video/DVD and computer generated programs are commonly used.  When courses are developed and as they are reviewed for updating the appropriate teaching methods are selected.

Program evaluations are conducted by the Office of Institutional Research to better understand the impact and help improve student-learning initiatives.  For example, multiple data sources, including survey, focus groups, and success rates, found that Supplemental Instruction (SI) participation was significantly associated with improved grade performance and course success rates in the natural sciences (2A.61).

Another example of how data and evaluation has been used to understand and improve new approaches to student learning was the evaluation of the First Year Experience (FYE).  A study was developed to compare student performance and persistence across basic skills English courses.  Some notable differences were found.  In fall 2010, students in 200-level FYE succeeded (C grade and above) at a ten percent higher rate than non-FYE students.  This difference was also found in spring 2011; FYE succeeded at a rate that was 15 percent higher than students who took non-FYE 200 level courses.  The same pattern, however, was not found for 400-level FYE courses (2A.71). This type of program evaluation data is illustrative of the College's use of data to better understand and improve student learning. 

EVALUATION:

Gavilan College meets Standard II (A)(2) (d).

PLAN:

None.

e.   The institution evaluates all courses and programs through an ongoing systematic review of their relevance, appropriateness, achievement of learning outcomes, currency, and future needs and plans.

DESCRIPTION:

The Institutional Effectiveness Committee (IEC) reviews all programs and services every three to five years.  This is done through the use of a self-study report followed by a validation process.  In addition, the Dean's Council may request programs be reviewed out of sequence based on cost, falling enrollment or a needs assessment.

Course and program updates are provided to the Curriculum Committee every four to five years. In these updates, faculty members are required to provide information about the learning outcomes, pedagogy, and curriculum. The committee regularly evaluates and revises its forms to ensure that they are relevant and appropriate to allow the committee to evaluate courses and program proposals.  Beginning in fall 2010 additional information on student learning outcomes was requested, including when they were last assessed (2A.72).

Programs are reviewed every three to five years through a self-study process with the Institutional Effectiveness Committee (IEC). The purpose of program review is to evaluate how well an instructional program functions in relation to its outcomes, the mission of the college, the college's institutional goals and priorities, accreditation standards and the needs of the community.  The program review process strengthens planning, influences program development, and may lead to program changes. The process focuses on improving student learning and encouraging instructional innovation.  The self-study report contains a section on Program/Student Learning Outcomes, including the results of the outcomes and how they will be used.  All programs and services, including instructional, non-instructional, student services and administrative services, go through the same review process.

The Office of Institutional Research provides data for evaluation in the areas of enrollment, FTES, student success rate, student retention rate, staffing levels and budgetary allocations.  Information provided by the self-study requires each program to include the specific goals, curricula, program and/or pedagogical modifications that were made within the program to support college-level strategic initiatives and student success.

Each program reviewed provides information on the issues and trends affecting the program.  The summary statement must also include significant accomplishments since the last review period.  It also requires the program to present evidence supporting their impact on student achievement and student learning outcomes.  The program review section on Program/Student Learning Outcomes requires the program to identify what percentage of course-level student outcomes have been assessed and whether assessments have been completed.  Results and use of the student learning outcomes data must also be reported.

The results of program reviews are used to strengthen planning, decision-making and scheduling.  They are also used to influence program development and improvement, to improve the use of college/district resources and to establish the basis for resource allocation requests for incorporation into department program plans and annual department budget requests.  Specifically the review asks the program to provide an overview of how budget allocations have changed over the past three to five years and to list the results of any significant additional budget or resource allocations/reductions over those three to five years.  In addition, the summary statement must include resource and staffing changes since the last review and their effect on the program.

Some examples of the applied outcome of the IEC program review self study process are illustrated by the following three program improvements:

1. The counseling department program review found a need for more collaboration among counselors. In response, the department established monthly roundtables for all counselors to discuss issues and concerns and plan activities, including training, that are of mutual interest.

2.   In the spring of 2010 an Assessment Task Force Committee was created to address the IEC recommendation to research a computer-based assessment tool.  The committee reviewed material and data on two top assessment tools used by colleges in California (Accuplacer and Compass).  A recently awarded Title V grant provided the funding needed to purchase Accuplacer. The system was implemented in summer 2012.

3.   The English department's program review led to improvements including a new assessment tool for student placement, and supported the hiring of an additional full-time faculty member (as recommended in the Faculty Five-Year Hiring Plan).

EVALUATION:

Gavilan College meets Standard II (A)(2) (e).

PLAN:

None.

f.    The institution engages in ongoing, systematic evaluation and integrated planning to assure currency and measure achievement of its stated student learning outcomes for courses, certificates, programs including general and vocational education, and degrees.  The institution systematically strives to improve those outcomes and makes the results available to appropriate constituencies.

DESCRIPTION:

Gavilan College has a well-developed, systematic, integrated planning process. The President's Council and the Office of Instructional Research have created a diagram (2A.6) to illustrate the planning process and the linkages between the different stages of planning, from establishment of plans to implementation to review. The planning process at Gavilan College is cyclical: The Educational Master Plan is reviewed and updated every 6 years; the Five-Year Strategic Plan is updated annually, and program planning with concurrent budget planning occurs annually.

Annually, programs reflect, plan and monitor progress through the program planning cycle (2A.11) (2A.6). In these annual plans, program representatives narrate their vision and annual objectives, with accompanying activities and budget requests.  Each program plan objective is linked to one or more specific objectives of the institutional Strategic Plan. Program plans that require additional funding must include linked budget requests, which are then ranked using a rubric by the area vice president, the budget committee and the deans as a defined part of the integrated planning process.  A recent improvement in the planning process is the direct linkage to the College's resource allocation process.  Decisions made by the Budget committee are directly related to the goals contained in the Strategic Plan (2A.157). Each year program representatives update the program planning website with their progress on the stated objectives, and this information informs the development of the following year's Strategic Plan.  Suggested revisions to the strategic plan are mined from these planning items and drafted by the committee, then shared extensively through the shared governance process, edited by all constituent groups, and approved by the president's cabinet and the Board of Trustees.

Gavilan College has a comprehensive program review process coordinated by the Institutional Effectiveness Committee (IEC) (2A.7).  Program reviews evaluate how well each program is functioning in relation to program objectives, the mission of the College, the College's institutional goals and priorities, and the needs of the community. The review process is designed to strengthen planning, decision making, and scheduling. IEC reviews are designed to influence program development and improvement, assess the interrelationships of programs, improve the use of College/district resources, establish the basis for changes to the strategic plan, establish the basis for resource allocation requests (incorporated into department program plans and budget requests) and improve student learning. Programs under review use data to assess their accomplishments, challenges and future objectives, contributing to improved institutional effectiveness.

The IEC self-study uses a collaborative model, which relies upon dialogue within the program and with the IEC to generate the program review report. The members of the IEC review each report both individually and collectively.  Representatives of the program under review are given a summary of questions and concerns and are invited to meet in-person with the committee to discuss these items.   Collaborative recommendations are generated and assessed two years after the review is completed.  At the end of each academic year, an executive summary and copies of the final program review summaries are provided to the Board of Trustees (2A.158). The Institutional Effectiveness Committee (IEC) reviews all instructional and non-instructional programs and is accountable to the President's Council and the Board of Trustees. 

These integrated planning processes operate through shared governance.  Elements of the process including the strategic planning and institutional effectiveness committee are made up of representatives from all the constituent groups. Moreover, input regarding how to improve is regularly collected and used to make modifications in the elements of the integrated planning system (2A.81). 

A survey taken in spring 2011 (2A.82) showed a need for more involvement in and explanation of the shared governance and planning processes, and that many staff members did not fully understand the process for resource allocation. In response, the Shared Governance / Integrated Planning Road Show was developed, and brought to college committees, departments and constituency groups over the course of 2012. The Road Show includes a new integrated planning diagram (2A.6), PowerPoint presentation (2A.83) and the opportunity for staff to ask questions and provide feedback on the process. Early feedback from the Road Show indicated that although the information is available, staff didn't know where to find it, so this information was included in later presentations. 

The fall 2012 survey showed improvement in all areas (2A.81). Respondents' reported improved levels of awareness and attitudinal rates regarding shared governance and integrated planning from previous years. Knowledge of the elements of integrated planning was relatively high, and also shows an increase over previous years. The improvement in levels of knowledge and understanding of the President's Council, shared governance, and planning process indicates that the corrective measures that have been put in place: the Shared Governance Road Show, creation of a Shared Governance handbook, and improvements to the planning process, are having a positive impact and should be continued.

Staff uses data from internal and external sources to analyze programs and inform planning. Institutional data are available on the website for the Office of Institutional Research (2A.17), which also publishes the Gavilan College Factbook (2A.15). Basic college data, including student demographics and enrollment data, are posted and updated at http://www.gavilan.edu/research/data. Regular reports on Student Success, student profiles, and the results of evaluations are posted at http://www.gavilan.edu/research/reports (2A.73). Program review self-study reports are posted at the IEC Website (2A.74). Strategic planning internal and external scan data are also available (2A.75), and intervention and program evaluation reports can also be found on the research website (2A.76).

Other data can be found through the California Partnership for Achieving Student Success (Cal-PASS), California Community College Chancellor's Office (CCCCO) MIS Data Mart, Gavilan Integrative Data System (GIDS) and a cohort tracking system for direct access to data. The Director of Institutional Research presents relevant data to decision-making and review committees (2A.77, 2A.78, 2A.79), and sends out research update e-mails to the entire campus (2A.80).

EVALUATION:

Gavilan College meets Standard II (A)(2) (f).

PLAN:

None.

g.   If an institution uses departmental course and/or program examinations, it validates their effectiveness in measuring student learning and minimizes test biases.

DESCRIPTION:

Instructional departments have developed different methods to validate the effectiveness and minimize test bias in examinations. The English as a Second Language (ESL) department, for example, used an oral interview as a part of their final exam that was graded by a rubric (2A.84).  For their writing classes they developed a rubric that was examined by a panel of instructors to minimize test biases.  The math department has used several common questions across their final exams for program assessment. For basic writing (ENG 440) and practical writing (ENG 250) the English department utilizes portfolios that are validated by rubrics (2A.85, 2A.86).  Multiple instructors (at least two) assess them each semester.  In addition, a norm setting session is completed each semester in which English instructors come together to look at samples and reach a common agreement as to how to use the rubric. For some of the programs in the Career and Technical Education division, including nursing, cosmetology, and aviation, students participate in external licensing exams that are validated through professional boards.

Gavilan College has completed updates to all Course Outlines of Record to ensure that they include measurable Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs).  This work was done through the curriculum committee process using Bloom's taxonomy as the measurable directive for each SLO.  These SLOs state what the students will learn in the course and how each outcome will be measured.  In addition, each instructional program has developed measurable program learning outcomes based again on Bloom's taxonomy.

EVALUATION:

Gavilan College meets Standard II (A)(2)(g).

PLAN:

None.

h.   The institution awards credit based on student achievement of the course's stated learning outcomes.  Units of credit awarded are consistent with institutional policies that reflect generally accepted norms or equivalencies in higher education.

DESCRIPTION:

Student Learning Outcomes appear both on the Course Outline of Record and syllabus for each course.  Through the articulation process Gavilan College courses that are accepted for transfer are deemed equivalent to courses offered at other community, four-year and private colleges and universities.

Course outlines follow the Title V regulations regarding credit requirements. Units of credit are based upon the Carnegie Unit, which requires a minimum of three hours of course-related work per unit of credit each week throughout a 16-week semester.  During a 16-week semester at Gavilan College, a typical three-unit lecture class will meet an average of 3.3 hours per week for classroom instruction and require an additional 6.7 hours per week of outside work (reading, library research, problem-solving, projects, term papers, etc.) for a total of approximately ten hours of course-related work per week.  Units of credit earned in laboratory/activity classes are also based upon the three hours per week per unit ratio.  (2A.87).  Gavilan's courses are articulated with courses of higher education that ensures that credits follow the accepted norms.

EVALUATION:

Gavilan College meets Standard II (A)(2) (h).

PLAN:

None.

i.    The institution awards degrees and certificates based on student achievement of a program's stated learning outcomes.

DESCRIPTION:

As a part of the curriculum review process, the Gavilan College Curriculum Committee evaluates all proposals for new and updated instructional programs.  Each program submission includes course requirements, rationale, and program learning outcomes (2A.156).  These submissions are reviewed and must be approved by the curriculum committee. Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs) for each degree and certificate awarded by the college have been developed and are listed in the college catalog.  The PLOs are aligned with the Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) required for program completion. All new programs additionally undergo an approval process through the California Community College Chancellor's Office. 

Dialogue around a program's achievement of learning outcomes occurs at the departmental level, among the department chairs, and at the Dean's Council, in addition to the curriculum committee.  The program review process also requires programs to list the results of the PLO assessments.  These findings are a part of the dialogue regarding program status and provide the basis for program improvement (2A.155). 

Currently PLOs for 34 of the 96 degrees and certificates have been assessed (2A.88).  Satisfactory completion of courses is based upon student assessments designed to measure the attainment of course-level SLOs. Degrees and certificates are awarded based upon the student's successful completion of required courses.

EVALUATION:

Gavilan College meets Standard II (A)(2) (i).

PLAN:

None.

3.   The institution requires of all academic and vocational degree programs a component of general education based on a carefully considered philosophy that is clearly stated in its catalogue.  The institution, relying on the expertise of its faculty, determines the appropriateness of each course for inclusion in the general education curriculum by examining the stated learning outcomes for the course.

DESCRIPTION:

Gavilan College prints the following description of general education, which was composed by the college faculty, in the Gavilan College Catalog:

"Gavilan's general education (GE) requirements introduce students to a variety of disciplines through which they comprehend and interact with the modern world" (2A.89). 

The GE requirements are central both to the college's mission and to its associate's degrees The catalog details what completion of the general education requirements will mean to a student and provides a list of general education learning outcomes. This information can also be found online. Updated transfer patterns are printed for distribution each year (2A.90). Gavilan College's general education pattern is articulated with four-year institutions paralleling lower division requirements and is reviewed regularly by the college's articulation officer. GE information is also included in the materials of the Curriculum Committee, and in Board policy (2A.91).

All General Education Learning Outcomes were completed in October 2008 based on Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) for the courses in the various GE areas. The GE Learning Outcomes are included in the college catalog for 2011-2013 (2A.92).

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) for general education courses are created by the faculty within each discipline. SLOs are constructed to promote understanding of basic content and methodology, and to require students to demonstrate critical thinking skills appropriate to an area of study.   SLOs and SLO assessment results are posted on the Gavilan College website.

SLOs are used to ensure that all General Education (GE) courses meet basic criteria under their appropriate categories. 

The Curriculum Committee has developed a form, for use by faculty, which includes the GE requirements.  As courses are updated, they must include E learning outcomes, area content, and methodology. The curriculum forms also require that faculty link SLOs with the appropriate GE Learning Outcome (GLO). Faculty wishing to add or delete a course in general education discuss the change at the department level. If the department is in agreement, the discussion continues to the Curriculum Committee for a deciding vote. The General Education philosophy is published in the catalog and serves as the basis for course inclusion or exclusion by the Curriculum Committee.

In spring 2011 the Academic Senate created the Associate of Arts – General Education (AA-GE) Task Force. The charge of the committee from the Academic Senate was to review the Gavilan College general education pattern, develop questions and recommendations based on the analysis, and consider an assessment of the GE pattern that would lead to a more efficient and meaningful composite of courses in the future. This review of GE requirements has assisted in the development of the new AA-T and AS-T degrees required by state legislation.

In 2011-2012 the faculty engaged in a discussion at the Curriculum Committee and Academic Senate regarding the Gavilan College GE diversity requirement, eventually deciding to keep the requirement at the same unit value (2A.93, 2A.94).

EVALUATION:

Gavilan College meets Standard II (A)(3).

PLAN:

None.

a. An understanding of the basic content and methodology of the major areas of knowledge: areas include the humanities and fine arts, the natural sciences, and the social sciences.

DESCRIPTION:

Gavilan courses listed in UC/CSU Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) Areas 1-5 and California State University (CSU) General Education (GE) Breadth Areas A-D span the traditional major areas of humanities and fine arts, natural sciences, and social sciences. The general education courses listed in the catalog (2A.95) that fulfill either the IGETC or CSU GE Breadth requirements were built, checked and articulated to produce learning outcomes demonstrating understanding of these disciplines.

All course outlines of record, including those for general education courses, require a detailed description of the course content, student performance objectives, and out-of-class assignments designed to reinforce classroom instruction. These areas are listed on Curriculum Forms C. After technical screening by the curriculum specialist and the Technical Screening Committee, course outlines are reviewed, discussed, and approved or rejected by the Curriculum Committee. The Gavilan College Articulation Officer reviews all course proposals and course revisions that pertain to general education courses and advises the committee regarding the materials presented.

Learning outcomes are used to ensure that all GE courses meet basic criteria under their appropriate categories.  In fall 2011, the Curriculum committee developed a form to include the multi-cultural requirement.  Form C has been modified to include the new changes (2A.14).

Through the assessment of SLOs, faculty can determine if the students are achieving the student learning outcomes.   A report dated July 2010 (2A.96), shares the results of a survey administered at the end of spring 2010 to a sample of students, in which students rated their improvement of GESLOs while attending Gavilan College. The results suggested that most students seem to improve in relation to the number of units they complete. Student learning outcomes are tied to course content.  The Curriculum Committee reviews all course outlines and ensures that they are updated as required.  Course outlines are reviewed every four to five years.

EVALUATION:

Gavilan College meets Standard II (A)(3) (a).

PLAN:

None.

b.   A capability to be a productive individual and life long learner: skills include oral and written communication, information competency, computer literacy, scientific and quantitative reasoning, critical analysis/logical thinking, and the ability to acquire knowledge through a variety of means.

DESCRIPTION:

Gavilan's general education (GE) requirements introduce students to a variety of disciplines through which they comprehend and interact with the modern world.  The GE requirements are central both to the college's mission and to its associate's degrees. Completion of the GE requirements produces General Education Student Learning Outcomes (GESLOs) which include:

"student's abilities to think and communicate clearly, both orally and in writing; to use mathematics and employ the scientific method; to understand the modes of inquiry in major disciplines; to be aware of other cultures and other eras; to apply critical thinking to ethical and social issues; and to develop a capacity for self understanding and improvement.  The student will develop a depth of knowledge in a specific field of interest.  In completing the requirements, students will come to understand basic principles, concepts and methodologies that may be unique to a specific discipline or universal in the quest for knowledge" (2A.89).

The criteria that have been developed to determine if students have attained these goals are outlined in the General Education Learning Outcomes (2A.92). As of March 2012, 68.5 percent of the GESLOs had been assessed. In spring of 2011, the Office of Instruction conducted a program review of the GE and Liberal Arts programs.  The review included a discussion of the elements of the GE program and a discussion of the rationale for the current composition (2A.96).  

The criteria that the college uses to ensure that the required skill level meets collegiate standards are Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) and Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs).  The consistent process for assuring that expected skill levels are included in course outlines are Course Prerequisites and Course Advisories.

EVALUATION:

Gavilan College meets Standard II (A)(3)(b).

PLAN:

None.

c.   A recognition of what it means to be an ethical human being and effective citizen; qualities include an appreciation of ethical principles; civility and interpersonal skills; respect for cultural diversity; historical and aesthetic sensitivity; and the willingness to assume civic, political, and social responsibilities locally, nationally and globally.

DESCRIPTION:

The Gavilan College Principles of Community (2A.1) set the overall parameters for ethical behavior. Within this document, Gavilan College aspires to be an institution that is diverse, purposeful, open and just (2A.98). Gavilan's Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs), Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs) and Institutional Learning Outcomes (ILOs) also encompass these important goals. Departments and classes, such as philosophy, communications, social science, and fine arts classes, instill appreciation for ethical principles and teach students how to use reasoning to identify their own ethical frameworks.  In 2009 Communication Studies developed a certificate of achievement for both Communication Studies and Interpersonal Communication.  Their PLOs include several outcomes related to this standard: practice and analyze democratic civic engagement and identify, develop, use, and assess tools and methods for community change and social justice (2A.99).

The Social Science Department offers a number of classes that address what it means to be an ethical human being. They also offer an AA with an Emphasis on Global Studies.  Communication Studies, with new certificates of achievement in Communication Studies and Interpersonal Communication, addresses civic engagement, community change, and social justice.  Classes in the philosophy and fine arts departments instill appreciation for ethical principles and teach students how to reason their own ethical frameworks.  Topics related to this standard (ethics, communication, diversity, community, citizenship, and social justice) are also presented through a student leadership class, courses containing service learning, our cultural diversity requirement, and the college's professional development day activities.  In addition, ethics, citizenship, respect for cultural diversity, and civic responsibility are a part of the college's SLOs, PLOs, and ILOs.

Service learning provides the students with the opportunity to gain knowledge of themselves and their communities.  It involves cooperative rather than competitive experiences for the students thus promoting invaluable skills associated with teamwork, community involvement, and citizenship.  The faculty, the college, and the community also benefit from this integrated community participation.  Lifelong habits of civic participation are fostered and students are exposed to community needs and cultivate civic-minded participation.  In addition, student and community misconceptions about at-risk, immigrant, and needy populations are addressed (2A.100).

A service learning component is included in a number of disciplines, including sociology, guidance, English, ecology, biology, anthropology, English as a Second Language, business, communications, political science, psychology, and administration of justice.

A cultural diversity requirement was added to Gavilan's general education pattern and AA degree in 2001 and fulfills Board Administrative Procedure 4025 (2A.101). This requirement states: "courses in this area will connect students' knowledge of self and society to larger cultural contexts. Students will be able to articulate the differences and singularities between and within cultures" (2A.102). There is a selection of classes that can be used to fulfill this requirement as listed in the Associate's Degree General Education Requirements (2A.103).

Training is provided to all employees on various topics related to this standard, often through Professional Development Day activities such as the presentation by Sarah Levitan Kaatz in Spring 2012 (2A.104).  Topics such as academic honesty, non-discrimination, harassment, communication, and diversity have been covered at various professional development days.

EVALUATION:

Gavilan College meets Standard II (A)(3) (c).

PLAN:

None.

4.   All degree programs include focused study in at least one area of inquiry or in an established interdisciplinary core.

DESCRIPTION:

All degree programs at Gavilan College have at least one area of focused study or interdisciplinary core and are listed in the Gavilan College Catalog (2A.105).

Vocational and occupational programs which award degrees and certificates have established advisory committees as outlined by the Chancellor's Office of California Community Colleges. Advisory committee members and faculty meet at least once per year to discuss curriculum, industry standards, and workforce skills. Their input is important in shaping curriculum and program design. Additionally, information is often collected from boards and/or external agencies that regulate identified programs or make available licensure passing rates.

EVALUATION:

Gavilan College meets Standard II (A)(4).

PLAN:

None.

5.   Students completing vocational and occupational certificates and degrees demonstrate technical and professional competencies that meet employment and other applicable standards and are prepared for external licensure and certification.

DESCRIPTION:

Gavilan College issues vocational and occupational degrees and certificates to those students who complete the requirements and who demonstrate competency in the prescribed vocational training program. Learning outcomes focus on the skills required for students to meet the standards and succeed with state licensure. 

The vocational and occupational programs that award degrees and certificates have advisory committees as outlined by the Chancellor's Office of California Community Colleges (2A.106). These advisory committees meet at least once per year to discuss and review curriculum, industry standards, and workforce skills, which is important in shaping curriculum and program design. There are professional advisory boards for each of the career technical education (CTE) programs (Administration of Justice, Allied Health, Aviation, Business, Child Development, and Cosmetology Advisory Committee Members 2011-2012). 

Gavilan College receives reports on state mandated competency exams that vocational and occupational students are required to take (Board Policy BP 4102 Occupational/Vocational Technical Programs). The cosmetology, aviation and nursing programs have consistently high pass rates for licensure exams that are made public in community reports (2A.107). Employment of CTE graduates is tracked through Vocational and Technical Education Act (VTEA) Core Indicator Reports (2A.108).

EVALUATION:

Gavilan College meets Standard II (A)(5).

PLAN:

None.

6.   The institution assures that students and prospective students receive clear and accurate information about educational courses and programs and transfer policies. The institution describes its degrees and certificates in terms of their purpose, content, course requirements, and expected student learning outcomes. In every class section students receive a course syllabus that specifies learning outcomes consistent with those in the institution's officially approved course outline.

DESCRIPTION:

Degree and certificate information, including Program Learning Outcomes, is listed in the Gavilan College Catalog for students and prospective students to review.  To ensure that this information is accurate, many groups and individuals on campus provide input, including the catalog production team, the enrollment specialist, area deans, and department chairs.

Deans review the course syllabi to verify that all information is accurate and that they contain the Student Learning Outcomes for that course.  All students enrolled in classes receive a copy of the syllabus for each course. Many instructors also post the syllabus online. Student Learning Outcomes are a part of the Course Outline of Record and are reviewed by the Curriculum Committee on a four to five year cycle.

Gavilan College has implemented a program called MyDegreeWorks that helps students track degree completion on-line, through their own portal.  MyDegreeWorks clearly lists courses that have been completed and those still in progress.  This allows students, at any time, to be able to assess the specific timeframe needed to achieve their educational goals. With the implementation of MyDegreeWorks, needed coursework and majors are clearly identified to help students meet educational goals.  The system takes existing curriculum and integrates it with the student's specific pathway and states what is still needed to complete degree objectives.  MyDegreeWorks provides historical insight and reflects the most current information with all curriculum updates.

The compilation of degrees and certificates in the college catalog is reviewed by the catalog production committee, made up of a cross section of all areas on campus:  admissions and records, management information systems, counseling, liberal arts, technical and public services, noncredit, community education, disability resources, curriculum, and enrollment management.  A format is agreed upon and used consistently throughout the catalog.

Prior to inclusion in the catalog, curriculum changes must be approved by the Curriculum Committee, the Board of Trustees and the Chancellor's Office.  The curriculum website is updated with the most current versions of the course outlines, which include Student Learning Outcomes for each course (2A.69, 2A.70).  As new and modified certificates and degrees are approved, those changes are included in the online catalog and MyDegreeWorks.  The printed catalog is updated every two years.

All courses are reviewed every four to five years.  At the beginning of every semester a list of courses that are due to be updated is posted on the curriculum website.  Course updates are faculty driven: faculty writes courses which are taken to the curriculum committee for approval.  The courses must then be approved by the Gavilan College Board of Trustees.  Lastly, the curriculum specialist submits the changes to the Chancellor's Office Curriculum Inventory for approval.  Course outlines are kept up-to-date by the curriculum specialist who maintains course information in the Banner database as well as the curriculum website (2A.13).  The College ensures that all sections adhere to the course objectives through the oversight of departmental chairs and deans. 

EVALUATION:

Gavilan College meets Standard II (A)(6).

PLAN:

None.

a.   The institution makes available to its students clearly stated transfer-of-credit policies in order to facilitate the mobility of students without penalty. In accepting transfer credits to fulfill degree requirements, the institution certifies that the expected learning outcomes for transferred courses are comparable to the learning outcomes of its own courses. Where patterns of student enrollment between institutions are identified, the institution develops articulation agreements as appropriate to its mission.

DESCRIPTION:

A brochure containing the AA/AS degree pattern, the IGETC transfer pattern and the CSU GE-Breadth transfer pattern is published at the start of fall semester each year by the Gavilan College Articulation Office (2A.90). This information is also printed in the Gavilan College Catalog.  The brochure is available to students at the counseling department and online.  It is also used by the outreach office and by the counselors during visits to area high schools.  Counselors distribute and discuss the brochure with students during individual counseling sessions.  In addition, degree patterns and transfer of coursework is discussed in orientations offered throughout the calendar year.  The counseling department maintains and continually updates its website which includes information on transfer of coursework.  The transfer patterns are also available to students directly through their MyDegreeWorks account.

Transfer-of-credit policies and the general education patterns are clearly and readily available in a number of places:  college schedules, college catalogs and through the counseling department in counseling sessions and orientations.  Counselors frequently direct students to the ASSIST computer program available on the web, which allows users to view all Gavilan College articulation with the UC and CSU schools (2A.109).

Courses that are transferred from other colleges undergo a rigorous transcript evaluation by counselors and the Admissions and Records Office.  Coursework is verified through numerous articulation websites and programs, including ASSIST.

Gavilan College has developed twenty-three articulation agreements with private colleges, twenty-three with California State University (CSU) campuses, and ten with the University of California (UC) schools, which include the UCSF School of Pharmacy and Dentistry and the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine.  More are in development, as the college articulation officer constantly updates current agreements and seeks new opportunities.  As new courses are developed, they are articulated as a priority with UC and CSU systems, and then agreements with other schools are updated after considerable research.  The articulation officer also keeps track of changes at four-year colleges, such as the addition of more stringent prerequisites, so they can be communicated through the Curriculum Committee to Gavilan College faculty.  The articulation officer scrutinizes all curricula to be sure they will meet the four-year requirements and researches changing GE patterns at four-year institutions.

Gavilan College is also in the process of developing AA-T and AS-T degrees in accordance with SB1440, the Student Transfer Achievement Reform Act. The act enables the California Community Colleges and the California State University system to collaborate on the creation of Associate in Arts Degree (AA) and Associate in Science (AS) Degree transfer programs.  This relatively new law requires community colleges to grant an associate degree for transfer to a student once a student has met specified general education and major requirements for the degree. Upon completion of the associate degree for transfer, the student is eligible for transfer with junior standing into the California State University (CSU) system. Students are given guaranteed admission into the California State University (CSU) system, and further are given priority consideration when applying to a particular program that is similar to the student's community college major. Four majors at Gavilan College (Administration of Justice, Communications, Mathematics and Kinesiology) have already had transfer degrees created and accepted.  Three more (Studio Art, Art History, and Theater Studies) have been locally approved and are awaiting Chancellor's Office approval.

Gavilan College is also participating in the course identity system (C-ID), a numbering system being developed to ease the transfer and articulation burdens in California's higher educational institutions. This system will make it easier for Gavilan courses to be accepted by most California two and four year institutions, thus ensuring the courses students complete at Gavilan College will be generally accepted for credit. The articulation officer reports to faculty once a semester regarding articulation issues, including SB1440 and C-ID, in presentations to department chairs and the curriculum committee.

The transfer process is clearly defined on the Transfer Center website, as well as on the Counseling/Transfer Services website.  The process is extensively explained during orientation sessions and individual and group counseling sessions.

EVALUATION:

Gavilan College meets Standard II (A)(6) (a).

PLAN:

None.

b.   When programs are eliminated or program requirements are significantly changed, the institution makes appropriate arrangements so that enrolled students may complete their education in a timely manner with a minimum of disruption.

DESCRIPTION:

A student at Gavilan College follows the current major courses and general education pattern outlined in the Gavilan College Catalog, beginning with the year the student first enrolled at the college. The policy provides students with "catalog rights", meaning that even when changes occur, students can be assured that the requirements that were in effect the first year they enrolled at the college will be the requirements they will be held to.

Students can also complete waiver forms to request a course substitution in a department that has made a change.  Departments generally work with students to come up with solutions that meet their needs. Reasonable accommodations are made with the idea of following the intent of the original catalog requirements.

The discontinuance of programs is addressed in Board Policy 4020 (2A.129). When programs are eliminated, the counselors, division dean, department chair, and instructors inform students of any modifications that have or will take place and assist students in continuing their studies.  Changes and modifications are noted in their MyDegreeWorks accounts ensuring consistency in the application of any modifications. The information collected in MyDegreeWorks allows the institution to collect data on which courses were solicited for substitutions and waivers.

Improvements have been made in informing counselors early in the process about course, certificate, or degree changes within any department.  Department chairs attend counseling meetings to notify counselors about any upcoming changes to majors and degrees.  They may also suggest appropriate substitutions the student may take to be able to complete the degree on the same time frame as once proposed.

In addition, the MyDegreeWorks program provides updated information, including any modifications to a program, on degrees and degree progress for the student through the on-line website.

EVALUATION:

Gavilan College does not entirely meet Standard II (A)(6)(b). Although Gavilan College has practices to guide and assist students and staff in the event of program discontinuance, there is not a formal and well-defined process. An administrative procedure supporting the Board policy addressing program discontinuance is under development.

PLAN: 

Develop a formal process regarding program discontinuance in collaboration with the Academic Senate and the Office of Instruction.

c.   The institution represents itself clearly, accurately, and consistently to prospective and current students, the public, and its personnel through its catalogs, statements, and publications, including those presented in electronic formats. It regularly reviews institutional policies, procedures, and publications to assure integrity in all representations about its mission, programs, and services.

DESCRIPTION:

College publications and information on the website are reviewed and updated on a regular basis, and are managed through task-oriented committees: the Schedule Production Committee, the Catalog Committee, and the District Technology Subcommittee on the Website, known colloquially as "Webheads." Printed documents include the Gavilan College Catalog, printed every two years, the Schedule of Classes, printed twice per year, the Report to the Community, printed twice per year, the Student Handbook, updated every two years, and registration information cards for the general public and continuing students, printed in conjunction with the Schedule of Classes. Informational brochures and cards have been developed for all of the Career Technical programs, most student services, the Fine Arts Department, the Social Sciences Department, and the Office of Noncredit Instruction. The Community Education department produces a printed catalog of classes three times per year. Publications that are not produced by the Schedule or Catalog production committees are reviewed and updated by the Public Information Office in conjunction with the dean of the area involved.

All aspects of the catalog and class schedule are regularly reviewed for clarity, accuracy, and consistency prior to the publication of each new volume or edition.  Both the publication committees and the faculty have an opportunity for review.  The articulation officer reviews the schedule and catalog on a regular basis to ensure courses reflect accurate transferability.  Institutional policies and procedures, student services descriptions, the college profile, etc., are distributed to appropriate departments on campus during each production cycle.  The curriculum specialist submits curriculum changes approved by the Curriculum Committee.  The entire process is overseen through a Schedule Production Committee and a Catalog Committee, both with broad based-membership and chaired by the vice president of student services.  Changes to the electronic files are made by the Public Information Office, which also coordinates print production and production of the online versions.  The Director of Public Information, who also sits on the publication committees, oversees the visual usability and marketing messages.  Prior to publication, a draft of each document is posted on the intranet. If, after the schedule has gone to print, there are additional changes, they are included in an Addendum available on the website as well as provided to counselors.

The catalog is available for purchase in the campus bookstore and at the Morgan Hill and Hollister sites. Reference copies are available in the campus library and in some student services offices. It is also posted on the Gavilan College website and linked from the homepage. Addendums to the college catalog and schedule of classes are also sent as needed via email to the appropriate constituencies on campus (counselors, admissions and records, deans, etc.) as well as to local high school counseling departments. Curriculum changes are included in the catalog after having been approved by the curriculum committee, the Board of Trustees and the Chancellor's Office (through the curriculum inventory).  Additionally, all degree and certificate descriptions are distributed and reviewed every two years by deans and department chairs before each catalog is printed.  Program learning outcomes are also included in all degrees and certificates.

The most up-to-date and complete class schedule and course information is available online on the "Self-Service Banner" system, which is linked from the homepage. It is not necessary to be an enrolled student to view the schedule and catalog information on Banner. The curriculum specialist and the offices of the deans of liberal arts and natural sciences and career technical education keep the information in Banner up-to-date.

A comprehensive handbook has been created outlining student conduct, academic standards, and rights and responsibilities.  The handbook is available through Admissions and Records, during new student orientations, and in individual counseling appointments. The handbook is also available electronically on the Gavilan College website (2A.110).

The catalog and schedule are provided upon request in alternate formats through the Disability Resource Center and the Vice President of Student Services.  The college makes every possible effort to ensure that the electronic versions of the catalog and schedule of classes are accessible for individuals requiring assistive technologies.

The Gavilan College website is updated by the webmaster on a regular basis, and reviewed by the District Technology Subcommittee on the Website. Page authors maintain control over content, but may be prompted for updates by the "Webheads" committee. Pages found to be out of date are disabled until they can be updated.

Publications and webpages reflect the most recent policies, procedures and plans available at the time of publication.  The Mission Statement is revised every five to six years.  The Strategic Plan is reviewed and updated annually, and the Educational Master Plan is evaluated and revised every six years.  The Faculty Handbook is revised every year. The following are evaluated and revised on an ongoing basis or as needed:  The College Safety Manual, the Curriculum Committee Guidelines, the Athletic Handbook, Board Policies, the Sexual Harassment Policy, the Hiring Policy, and Academic Senate and its committees' bylaws.

Twice a year the Community College League's Board Policy and Administrative Procedure Service provides updates to districts, developed by the League's partner, Liebert, Cassidy, and Whitmore.  The updates address changes resulting from new laws and regulations and subscriber requests.  The policies are updated on a regular basis although the updates themselves occur throughout the year.  Using the college's shared governance process, the Board of Trustees evaluates each recommended policy change and adjusts policies to meet the specific needs of the college.

Gavilan College provides public access to data on student achievement through the research website, annual Report to the Community, and public presentations. A Factbook was created in 2009 and updated in 2012.  Data is also readily available by request to the Office of Institutional Research, which maintains a webpage with an ongoing list of reports and survey results (2A.15). Reports and tables provide both current and longitudinal information. The research site is accessible from the Gavilan College homepage linked from the "About Gavilan" drop-down menu.

Information on student achievement is also included in the "Report to the Community" which is published annually by the Public Information Office and is disseminated and accessed by selecting the "More News and Events" link on the Gavilan College homepage (2A.159). Gavilan College promotes stories of student achievement by publishing student, staff, and alumni profiles in the schedule of classes and staff accomplishments in Campus News.

GavTV is another powerful medium for information sharing. GavTV content is overseen by a committee including the GavTV Executive producer, Gavilan College Director of Public Information, Dean of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Gavilan's Distance Education Coordinator, faculty members, a staff/student professional expert, the studio Media Technician, and the Gavilan Multi Media Technician. GavTV streams original programming about news and events at Gavilan College online and provides content to local public access television channels. Original programming includes regular productions of Good Morning Gavilan, Gavazine!, Gavilan Connects, Art is Essential, Let's Ask Alice, and other locally-created content.

Gavilan College has updated and expanded information on the Office of Institutional Research website.  Research includes: state and federal reporting requirements, student/programmatic outcomes design and assessment, strategic planning findings, board reporting requirements, needs and assessment and evaluations associated with external funding, assessment instrument validation, internal research requests, external research requests.

EVALUATION:

Gavilan College meets Standard II (A)(6) (c).  

PLAN:

None.

7.   In order to assure the academic integrity of the teaching-learning process, the institution uses and makes public governing board-adopted policies on academic freedom and responsibility, student academic honesty, and specific institutional beliefs or world views. These polices make clear the institution's commitment to the free pursuit and dissemination of knowledge.

DESCRIPTION:

Gavilan College has a board-approved policy on academic freedom (2A.111) that is posted online, in the college catalog (2A.112), in the student handbook (2A.113), and in the faculty contract (2A.114).  Gavilan's Principles of Community statement outlines the College's code of ethics and is posted throughout campus as well as on many publications.

A policy on academic honesty has been board approved (2A.115) and posted online, published in the college catalog (2A.116), in the student handbook (2A.117), and is included in course syllabi and may be referenced by instructors during class sessions.

EVALUATION:

Gavilan College meets Standard II (A)(7).  

PLAN:

None.

a.   Faculty distinguishes between personal conviction and professionally accepted views in a discipline. They present data and information fairly and objectively.

DESCRIPTION:

Policies distinguishing both personal conviction and professionally accepted views are in the faculty contract (2A.114) and the Gavilan Joint Community College Board Policy (2A.111). Gavilan College communicates expectations of faculty members during Professional Development Day through the president's State of the College Address and during workshop sessions.

During department meetings faculty discuss the distinction between personal conviction and professionally accepted views in their discipline. Peer reviews help faculty members address concerns and questions. Faculty members also keep up to date with current topics in their discipline by attending academic conferences and symposiums. Class surveys, evaluations, and institutional research are used to assess how effective faculty meets expectations. For students, The Student's Problem Resolution Process (2A.110, 2A.160) provides a procedure to help students address problems and resolve issues that apply to specific situations on campus.

Gavilan College has several policies that distinguish the difference between professional and personal views. Commitment to Diversity Policy (2A.118) states that Gavilan College is committed to recognizing diversity. The Faculty Responsibilities section of the Faculty Handbook includes a section on the Code of Ethics of the Education Profession (2A.119).

There are several board policies that demonstrate Gavilan College's commitment to the free pursuit and dissemination of knowledge. Board Policy Institutional Planning (BP 3250) (2A.120) aims to provide students the best possible learning experiences, high quality support systems, and an environment that promotes learning. Board Policy Non-discrimination (BP 3410) (2A.121) states that each individual at Gavilan College shall be provided access to its services, classes, and programs, without discrimination. Commitment to Diversity Policy (Board Policy BP 7100) (2A.118) states that Gavilan College is committed to recognizing diversity. Board Policy Academic Freedom (BP 4030) states that a faculty member can exercise academic freedom so long as he/she distinguishes between personal opinion and factual information (2A.111).

Gavilan College faculty members have displayed an understanding of the difference between personal conviction and professionally accepted views in a discipline. The college has mechanisms in place such as peer evaluations and reviews that allow for the engagement of dialogue. Students at Gavilan College hold Student Voices forums and panels where students can share ideas, inputs, and opinions about being a student at Gavilan College. A video "Student Voices: Are We Listening?"  was created by Gavilan students and staff to help share the ideas and thoughts of Gavilan students. The video was played at Professional Development Day and is available online (2A.122).

EVALUATION:

Gavilan College meets Standard II (A)(7) (a).  

PLAN:

None.

b.   The institution establishes and publishes clear expectations concerning student academic honesty and consequences of dishonesty.

DESCRIPTION:

Polices of academic honesty are included in course syllabi, may be discussed during class at the beginning of each semester, and made available online, in the Gavilan College Catalog (2A.116), and in the student handbook (2A.117).

To enforce policies of academic honesty Gavilan College instructors enforce consequences/penalties (ex. failing grade, recommendation for dismissal) for violations of academic integrity such as cheating or plagiarism. Gavilan College instructors also utilize plagiarism detection services and software, such as TurnItIn.

Though the Academic Honesty Policy is widely distributed throughout campus and faculty and staff members receive training on how to prevent academic dishonesty, students occasionally are unaware of or don't understand the policy and faculty members have needed support in enforcement.

There are on-going training opportunities in which full-time and part-time faculty and appropriate support staff can receive refresher training on how to prevent, recognize, and respond to violations of academic honesty (2A.123).

EVALUATION:

Gavilan College meets Standard II (A)(7) (b).  

PLAN:

None.

c.   Institutions that require conformity to specific codes of conduct of staff, faculty, administrators, or students, or that seek to instill specific beliefs or world views, give clear prior notice of such policies, including statements in the catalog and/or appropriate faculty or student handbooks.

DESCRIPTION:

Gavilan College's Principles of Community is provided in the Gavilan College Catalog (2A.124) and states that members of the Gavilan College Community must maintain the highest ethical standards in order to establish an atmosphere of civility, honesty, cooperation, professionalism and fairness. Standards of Conduct (Board Policy BP 5500) are included in the college catalogue (2A.125), the Student Handbook (2A.126), online, and posted in administration offices, and many course syllabi.

Gavilan faculty, staff, and students are expected to conform to codes of conduct as communicated in Board Polices (BP 5500 Standards of Conduct) (2A.127). All new Gavilan students must read and complete the "Gavilan College/High School Contract Form" which states "All students shall conform to the college's academic rules, regulations, and codes of conduct" (2A.128).

The Program, Curriculum, and Course Development Policy (Board Policy BP 4020) states that programs and curricula of Gavilan College shall be of high quality, relevant to community and student needs, and evaluated regularly to ensure quality and currency (2A.129). The approval of any new program or changes to existing programs must be passed through the Program Approval Process and submitted to the California Community College Chancellor's Office for its approval, prior to advertising or offering the program (2A.130).

EVALUATION:

Gavilan College meets Standard II (A)(7) (c).  

PLAN:

None.

8.   Institutions offering curricula in foreign locations to students other than U.S. nationals operate in conformity with standards and applicable Commission policies.

DESCRIPTION:

Standard II (A)(8) is not applicable as Gavilan College does not offer such a curriculum.

EVALUATION:

Not applicable.

PLAN:

None.


Standard II (A) Evidence


Last modified: February 20, 2013
Gavilan College Red Diamond 5055 Santa Teresa Boulevard Red Diamond Gilroy, CA 95020 Red Diamond (408) 848-4800