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STANDARD IIIB:  Physical Resources



Physical resources, which include facilities, equipment, land, and other assets, support student learning programs and services and improve institutional effectiveness. Physical resource planning is integrated with institutional planning.




  1. The institution provides safe and sufficient physical resources that support and assure the integrity and quality of its programs and services, regardless of location or means of delivery.

DESCRIPTION:

Gavilan College evaluates the physical safety of its facilities through:

  • Daily and weekly safety walks of the buildings and grounds by the maintenance, custodial, and grounds departments (3B.1).
  • Accident/Injury/Incident Reports received by student health services, security, and others are submitted to the administrative assistant to the vice president of administrative services (3B.2). The report goes to the director of facilities services and the district's Health, Safety, Facilities, and Grounds (HSFG) Committee.
  • Safety/Health Hazard Forms submitted to key personnel for review and response (3B.2). The form and subsequent action is reported to the Health, Safety, Facilities, and Grounds Committee.
  • The Illness, Injury Prevention Program binder contains checklists that are used to evaluate safety (3B.3).
  • Health and safety concerns are also reported by telephone, mail, and word of mouth by both internal and external users.
  • The district, as part of the Northern California Community Colleges Pool (NCCCP) workers' compensation JPA, employs and shares two (2) full-time safety coordinators who act as resources and attend the HSFGC meetings.

The HSFG Committee receives all reports of safety concerns and personnel injuries that occur on district property. This committee is composed of representatives of all constituent groups on campus and its by-laws and meeting minutes are posted on the Gavilan College intranet (3B.4). The recommendations made by the HSFG Committee are presented to the President's Council for information and/or further action. Recommendations from HSFG Committee, the Injury, Illness Prevention Program (IIPP), and the safety coordinators aid the director of facilities services in ensuring that the properties owned and leased by the district are maintained in the safest possible condition (3B.5).

In addition, the district belongs to the Statewide Association of Community Colleges (SWACC) and is a member of the Bay Area California Community Colleges District (BACCD) JPA. A SWACC inspection team provides a "Property & Liability Inspection Report" (3B.6). The inspection team evaluates every room on district property for health and safety concerns. A detailed report is provided to the director of facilities services for the actions suggested by the provider. The district also has a District Emergency Plan and Procedures Guide (3B.7) which provides emergency response guidelines and procedures.

The district is studying space allocation and using that as a tool in designing classrooms, lecture halls, labs, and other facilities. The effort will maximize space utilization and possibly provide additional state bond funds. The district has contracted with Merle Cannon of Cannon & Associates, an educational planning consultant, to suggest alternative space usage to maximize facilities use. In the utilization analysis report, completed in 2005, lecture and laboratory spaces were the only spaces used in the state's computation of capacity and only those buildings with such spaces were evaluated (3B.8). This information can be useful in making decisions about changing space configurations during renovation and remodeling to improve the overall capacity-to-load ratios. Capacity-to-load ratios are critical components in determining eligibility of the district in the State Capital Outlay Program. The complete utilization analysis report can be found in 3B.8 reference documents. A Space Use Summary follows. Note that any percentage under 100 indicates a low utilization of usable space.

 

              SPACE USE SUMMARY           

 
 

               By Building/Complex

   
   

     Space ASF

  Utilization Rates

Building/Complex

Lecture

    Lab

Lecture

  Lab

Physical Science

970

3,051

87%

29%

Chemistry

 

1,041

3,519

82%

47%

Life Science

985

4,956

112%

56%

Library

 

695

0

72%

n/a

Theater

 

1,315

1,282

40%

76%

Cosmetology

0

3,800

n/a

70%

Humanities

 

3,766

836

56%

237%

Art Complex

0

7,349

n/a

27%

Business

 

2,975

6,618

38%

57%

Social Science

5,966

979

49%

113%

Occ. Ed

 

1,327

0

26%

n/a

Community Ed.

1,008

0

26%

n/a

Criminal Justice

1,704

1,222

16%

65%

Health Occupations

0

5,253

n/a

49%

Child Development

277

0

16%

n/a

Hollister

 

4,316

11,339

56%

77%

Morgan Hill

6,838

2,031

21%

77%

In response to growing offsite facilities' needs, health and safety needs, and deteriorating infrastructure, the Gavilan Board of Trustees placed a capital outlay bond before voters. The dollar value of the bond and the bond projects were determined in part by a survey of internal and external users and polling of potential voters. The Measure E Bond was approved in March 2004, for a total of $108M (3B.9, Section 3.0, p. 9-10).

A series of planning meetings were held between March and July of 2005 that included the district's administration and facilities personnel; BFGC Architects Planners; Kitchell CM and other consultants. They discussed key elements such as accessibility, infrastructure, bond scope, budget and schedule, and district space and materials standards. A draft of the Facilities Master Plan was completed on August 9, 2005. The draft was distributed to staff and a series of public forums were held to present, explain, and seek broad feedback from the college's diverse stakeholders that included faculty, staff, students, and community. Copies of the draft were sent to public libraries within the college's service area that include Gilroy, San Benito County, and Morgan Hill.

Concurrent with the public review and comment period, the planning team, BFGC, Kitchell, and district representatives, conducted a series of user-group meetings to develop instructional and space adequacy needs within each of the district buildings. As a result of the meetings, the planning team prepared and reviewed possible solutions for defined needs. Interactive planning meetings with team and users produced a final set of recommendations and a scope-of-work for each building. The recommendations were reviewed with the HSFG Committee and the Board Facilities Subcommittee. The draft of the Facilities Master Plan was approved by the Board of Trustees on February 14, 2006 (3B.9, Section 7, p. 3). The minutes of meetings are posted on the district website and are available in the administrative services' office (3B.10). The results from the meetings (3B.10) were used to compose a priority list of projects (3B.11). A two-month public review and comment period was set and copies of all input received is included under Appendix 9.7 of the Facilities Master Plan (3B.12, Appendix 9.7).

The Gavilan College main campus in Gilroy is over forty years old. The existing resources do not meet the needs of the district. The buildings and equipment are failing at an alarming rate. In the 2004-2005 and 2005-2006 fiscal years, unscheduled maintenance repairs to buildings and equipment cost the district over $314,000 (3B.13). The costs were absorbed by the general fund. In the future, Measure E bond funds will be used to remodel existing buildings and infrastructure.

The district maintains three off-site campuses and a facility at the Hollister Airport. The needs of the sites are determined in the same manner and through the same processes as the needs for the main campus. The Gavilan sites in Morgan Hill and Hollister share staffing concerns that have sometimes resulted in theft of equipment. The Morgan Hill site is alarmed and has a contracted security guard company to respond to alarm calls after hours. Although the Hollister site does not have an alarm system, it shares the building with a substation for the city police department and is patrolled by a private security company that is paid for by the property owner. The airport site has minimal security and almost no vandalism. Vandalism at an airport is a federal offense. The main campus has numerous computer labs equipped with burglar alarms and is patrolled by the in-house security department between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 11:00 p.m. daily. Unsafe conditions at any of the Gavilan College sites are reported to the safety coordinator or to the HSFG Committee for evaluation and action. If conditions are determined to be health and/or safety issues, it is the responsibility of the director of facilities services and the maintenance department to work with the property owners and the instructional site managers to bring the areas up to safe standards.

An ADA Transition Plan was completed in 2005. This document addresses Title 24 of the California Building Code and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) for all buildings at Gavilan College (3B.14, 3B.15). The findings and recommendations will be integrated into the Measure E renovation process. The director of facilities services, with input from the employees in the department, determines the sufficiency of the equipment used by the maintenance, custodial and grounds departments. Replacement maintenance equipment is chosen to meet ergonomic standards.

The district has given sufficient consideration to equipment for selected distance programs. VATEA funds support the computer lab, smart classrooms, and wireless network at the airport site in Hollister. The staff resource center has computers updated on a regular basis and new software installed as the needs of the staff and instructors change. Specialized hardware has been provided for staff and instructors, such as scanners, a color printer, laminator, etc. In addition, several laptops are available on loan for the distance education instructors. Televised courses, Channel 18 GavTV, library videos, and San Jose State's live telecourses are included in the Distance Education Program.

The district effectively distributes and uses technology on campus. Measure E has provided the funds to implement a computer replacement plan developed by the district's Technology Committee and found in the Technology Plan (3B.16).

EVALUATION:

The college meets this standard. The Gavilan College main campus in Gilroy is over forty years old. Through the years, safety procedures have been developed collaboratively with maintenance, faculty, staff, students, consultants, and the community. The result produces a learning, teaching, and working environment that is safe and accessible. ADA issues were not a concern when the campus was built. Walkway access, road transitions, access to and within facilities, and other specific areas for persons with disabilities is addressed in the current ADA Transition Plan (3B.15).

Each year classrooms, labs, and other facilities become less sufficient as technology, scope of teaching, and usage moves beyond the 1960's design. With Measure E funds, the district will be able to upgrade the infrastructure, heating and air conditioning, address the A.D.A. concerns, and with a collaborative design process, maximize building room usage.

PLAN:

None


  1. The institution plans, builds, maintains, and upgrades or replaces its physical resources in a manner that assures effective utilization and the continuing quality necessary to support its programs and services.

DESCRIPTION:

Use of the following resources will help the district use Measure E funds to redesign buildings and classrooms for maximum space use and multiple discipline use:

  • Space Utilization Analysis by Merle Cannon, 2005 (3B.8)
  • Capacity-to-Load Ratio (3B.8)
    Input from architects, design engineers, building user groups,and students.

The director of facilities services determines equipment replacement needs as indicated by age and wear and tear on the equipment. Maintenance of the equipment is determined by how often the equipment is used. For example, vacuum cleaners are used daily and require more maintenance than other specialty equipment. When all maintenance equipment functions properly, program and services needs are seamlessly integrated into daily, weekly, monthly, and yearly campus maintenance. Equipment is purchased to meet specific needs of each department.

Based on the Space Utilization Analysis (3B.8), the district was underutilizing its classroom, lecture, and lab facilities. This analysis compared space and utilization rates for lecture and laboratory classrooms on the main campus, Morgan Hill, and Hollister. The use of the science building lecture rooms met the expected usage while the rest of the buildings were just above or lower than 50 percent. With the exception of the humanities building, laboratory spaces had an overall utilization rate below 50 percent.

Beginning in fall 2006, the district began a 16-week compressed calendar that expanded the instructional day into the afternoon hours. The conversion to both block scheduling and the compressed 16-week calendar has made for better use of classrooms and facilities. The district has done a good job in planning its physical resources and will assure that the buildings which house instructional programs and student services are constructed and maintained to assure accessibility, safety, security, and a healthful learning and working environment.

EVALUATION:

With the passage of Measure E, the district will be able to upgrade the infrastructure, heating and air conditioning, address the ADA compliance standards, and with a collaborative design process, maximize building and room utilization.

Facilities services' main obstacle currently is a shortage of maintenance and custodial staff though the remodeling using Measure E bond funds is expected to alleviate the maintenance staff shortage due to decreased maintenance. During the last round of district budget cuts in 2003, two custodial positions were eliminated by attrition and not replaced. The consequences of this reduction have had a detrimental affect on the overall maintenance, health, and safety in classrooms and offices. For example, restrooms are often not cleaned and maintained on a daily basis, carpet and flooring are not vacuumed or swept regularly, and trash, which often includes perishable food items, is sometimes not emptied daily. The maintenance department continues to receive complaints concerning the upkeep of classrooms and office.

PLAN:

  • Address support requirement needs in the facilities services' department.
  • Monitor space utilization numbers now that the 16-week calendar is in effect.

  1. The institution assures that physical resources at all locations where it offers courses, programs, and services are constructed and maintained to assure access, safety, security, and a healthful learning and working environment.

DESCRIPTION:

The district's maintenance department keeps the access roads safe and maintained in a condition that assures the safe use of the facility. Maintenance is responsible for the care and maintenance of all interior roads, walkways, and pathways. Weekly sweeps of the physical campus are made by the grounds and maintenance crew to identify potential accessibility issues, grounds safety issues, door and campus lighting issues. When specific concerns are identified, repairs are made as quickly as possible.

The district completed the required ADA Transition Plan in 2005 (3B.15). It was approved by the Board of Trustees on February 14, 2006 and incorporated into the Measure E bond renovations.

While the main library stacks are safe by present-day seismic standards for buildings in zone four seismic zones, the stacks in the Quiet reading Room may not meet the current standards.

The off-site facilities are under the immediate supervision of individual instructional site managers and under the general direction of the vice president of student services. The instructional site managers ensure that their facilities meet the needs of the students, staff, and the community. If any needs are unmet, these are reported to the appropriate campus department and/or committee for action.

EVALUATION:

The college still needs to verify that all library stacks are safe by present-day seismic standards for buildings in zone four seismic zones. However, the library building renovation under the Measure E Bond (3B.11) will bring air-conditioning, major wiring, and other improvements in 2007/2008.

PLAN:

  • Verify all library stacks are up to seismic safety standards for buildings in zone four seismic zones.

  1. To assure the feasibility and effectiveness of physical resources in supporting institutional programs and services, the institution plans and evaluates its facilities and equipment on a regular basis, taking utilization and other relevant data into account.

DESCRIPTION:

The Five Year Construction Plan (3B.17) and the Space Utilization Analysis (3B.8) are available to the district as tools for measuring facilities use. The Space Utilization Analysis compares the capacity of facilities to the demands created by the actual and projected enrollment of the college or off-site. The Five Year Construction Plan informs the state legislature of the capital outlay needs of the college district over a five-year period. It also serves as the foundation for capital outlay funding applications by delineating the capacity to load ratios for five categories of space defined in Title 5 of the California Administrative Code:  lecture, laboratory, office, library, and audio-visual/TV. Submission of the Five Year Construction Plan to the State Chancellor's Office each year is mandatory (3B.18, Ed Code Section 81800 et al.).

The director of facilities services assesses and evaluates the use of the facility through the daily work order process. The process determines the level of wear and tear, additional student impact, and the overall condition of the physical campus. The policy for this process is found in the Faculty Handbook under "Maintenance and Repair" (3B.19). Input also comes from a wide range of committees (3B.20).

The Facility Master Plan, Volume 2, Appendices 9.1–9.7 (3B.12, Table of Contents, p.1) are guides to evaluate and determine the best use of campus funds to improve facilities and equipment. Findings and reports are presented to the President's Council, the president, and ultimately the Board of Trustees and may be incorporated into the long-range capital plans supporting institutional improvement goals.

EVALUATION:

The college meets this standard.

PLAN:

None


  1. Long-range capital plans support institutional improvement goals and reflect projections of the total cost of ownership of new facilities and equipment.

DESCRIPTION:

The district uses the Five Year Construction Plan, Educational Master Plan, and the Technology Master Plan as resources in the capital planning process. Capital plans are directly linked with institutional planning. Needs of the faculty and students are determining factors in the capital planning process. Suggestions are forwarded to the president/superintendent and the President's Council from a number of committees  composed of representatives from all constituent groups on campus. Recommendations are then made to the Board of Trustees.

To define Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) in regard to physical resources, factors combining the following elements are used to determine the formula:

  • Plan – the plan must be designed and developed to provide maximum    resources.
  • Build – the building must be multi use and user friendly.
  • Power – there must be adequate power resources to suit the immediate and long-term needs of the instructional and technological needs of the building.
  • Clean – the building's design must factor in the ease and accessibility to keep these areas clean.
  • Repair – eventually, the building will need repair. Standardization, accessibility, and simplicity are key design factors.

The TCO formula is the foundation for the design phase of the Measure E renovations.

The planning processes are a collaboration of deans, department chairs, Gavilan's committee groups (3B.20), President's Council, the president, and the Board of Trustees.

EVALUATION:

The college meets this standard.

PLAN:

None


  1. Physical resource planning is integrated with institutional planning. The institution systematically assesses the effective use of physical resources and uses the results of the evaluation as the basis for improvement.

DESCRIPTION:

Physical resource plans are directly linked with institutional planning. The needs of the faculty and students are the determining factors in the capital planning process. Suggestions are forwarded to the president/superintendent and the President's Council from committees composed of representatives from all constituent groups on campus. Recommendations are made to the Board of Trustees. On February 14, 2006 the Facilities Master Plan was approved by the Board of Trustees (3B.21).

Sixty-four million dollars of the Measure E funds have been designated for remodeling buildings on the main campus and repairing and upgrading the underground infrastructure to meet the current and future needs for power, technology, and equipment. The buildings and classrooms will be designed to provide safer accessibility to all users and a healthier environment for teaching, studying, working, and public access. A design team worked closely with all campus user groups and committees. Information gathered became part of the design template and the foundation on which the district will ensure that Measure E funds will be spent for the greater good of the district and the community it serves.

The district began construction in the summer of 2006 with the campus infrastructure upgrade and replacement of the gas, electrical service and supply, phone, and data upgrades.

EVALUATION:

The college meets this standard. There are noted deficiencies on the main campus. Many of the buildings are not air conditioned; interiors, exteriors, equipment and furniture are worn and out-of-date; the restrooms are in need of extensive renovation and remodeling; systems that provide the infrastructure such as power lines, and phone cables are overloaded and Section 508 ADA requirements must be addressed. The passage of Measure E provides the district with the funds to modernize the main campus. The infrastructure and boiler repairs began in the summer of 2006. Buildings identified in the bond will be remodeled or renovated to better suit the needs of students, faculty, and staff. Lighting upgrades will provide a safer environment for those using the facilities at night. New ADA requirements will be addressed.

PLAN:

None

Last modified: February 4, 2007
Gavilan College Red Diamond 5055 Santa Teresa Boulevard Red Diamond Gilroy, CA 95020 Red Diamond (408) 848-4800